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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Azimba girls of central Africa has a direct and recognized 

relationship to the demands of real life, the somewhat allied 

_danses du ventre_ of the Hamitic peoples of northern Africa are 

merely an amusement, a play more or less based on the sexual 

instinct. At the same time it is important to bear in mind that 

there is no rigid distinction between dances that are, and those 

that are not, primitive. As Haddon truly points out in a book 

containing valuable detailed descriptions of dances, even among 

savages dances are so developed that it is difficult to trace 

their origin, and at Torres Straits, he remarks, "there are 

certainly play or secular dances, dances for pure amusement 

without any ulterior design." (A.C. Haddon, _Head Hunters_, p. 

233.) When we remember that dancing had probably become highly 

developed long before man appeared on the earth, this difficulty 

in determining the precise origin of human dancing cannot cause 

surprise. 

 

Spix and Martius described how the Muras of Brazil by moonlight 

would engage all night in a Bacchantic dance in a great circle, 

hand in hand, the men on one side, the women on the other, 

shouting out all the time, the men "Who will marry me?" the 

women, "You are a beautiful devil; all women will marry you," 

(Spix and Martius, _Reise in Brasilien_, 1831, vol. iii, p. 

1117.) They also described in detail the dance of the Brazilian 

Puris, performed in a state of complete nakedness, the men in a 

row, the women in another row behind them. They danced backward 

and forward, stamping and singing, at first in a slow and 

melancholy style, but gradually with increasing vigor and 

excitement. Then the women began to rotate the pelvis backward 

and forward, and the men to thrust their bodies forward, the 

dance becoming a pantomimic representation of sexual intercourse 

(ibid., vol. i, 1823, pp. 373-5). 

 

Among the Apinages of Brazil, also, the women stand in a row, 

almost motionless, while the men dance and leap in front of them, 

both men and women at the same time singing. (Buscalioni, "Reise 

zu den Apinages," _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1899, ht. 6, p. 

650.) 

 

Among the Gilas of New Mexico, "when a young man sees a girl whom 

he desires for a wife, he first endeavors to gain the good-will 

of the parents; this accomplished, he proceeds to serenade his 

lady-love, and will often sit for hours, day after day, near her 

home, playing on his flute. Should the girl not appear, it is a 

sign she rejects him; but if, on the other hand, she comes out to 

meet him, he knows that his suit is accepted, and he takes her to 

his home. No marriage ceremony is performed."[33] (H.H. Bancroft, 

_Native Races of the Pacific_, vol. i, p. 549.) 

 

"Among the Minnetarees a singular night-dance is, it is said, 

sometimes held. During this amusement an opportunity is given to 

the squaws to select their favorites. A squaw, as she dances, 

will advance to a person with whom she is captivated, either for 

his personal attractions or for his renown in arms; she taps him 

on the shoulder and immediately runs out of the lodge and betakes 

herself to the bushes, followed by the favorite. But if it should 

happen that he has a particular preference for another from whom 

he expects the same favor, or if he is restrained by a vow, or is 

already satiated with indulgence, he politely declines her offer 

by placing his hand in her bosom, on which they return to the 

assembly and rejoin the dance." It is worthy of remark that in 

the language of the Omahas the word _watche_ applies equally to 

the amusement of dancing and to sexual intercourse. (S.H. Long, 

_Expedition to the Rocky Mountains_, 1823, vol. i, p. 337.) 

 

At a Kaffir marriage "singing and dancing last until midnight. 


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