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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

In Sumatra Marsden states that chastity prevails more, perhaps, 

than among any other people: "But little apparent courtship 

precedes their marriages. Their manners do not admit of it, the 

_boojong_ and _geddas_ (youths of each sex) being carefully kept 

asunder and the latter seldom trusted from under the wings of 

their mothers.... The opportunities which the young people have 

of seeing and conversing with each other are at the _birnbangs_, 

or public festivals. On these occasions the young people meet 

together and dance and sing in company. The men, when determined 

in their regard, generally employ an old woman as their agent, by 

whom they make known their sentiments, and send presents to the 

female of their choice. The parents then interfere, and the 

preliminaries being settled, a _birnbang_ takes place. The young 

women proceed in a body to the upper end of the _balli_ (hall), 

where there is a part divided off for them by a curtain. They do 

not always make their appearance before dinner, that time, 

previous to a second or third meal, being appropriated to 

cock-fighting or other diversions peculiar to men. In the evening 

their other amusements take place, of which the dances are the 

principal. These are performed either singly or by two women, two 

men, or with both mixed. Their motions and attitudes are usually 

slow, approaching often to the lascivious. They bend forward as 

they dance, and usually carry a fan, which they close and strike 

smartly against their elbows at particular cadences.... The 

assembly seldom breaks up before daylight and these _birnbangs_ 

are often continued for several days together. The young men 

frequent them in order to look out for wives, and the lasses of 

course set themselves off to the best advantage. They wear their 

best silken dresses, of their own weaving, as many ornaments of 

filigree as they possess, silver rings upon their arms and legs, 

and ear-rings of a particular construction. Their hair is 

variously adorned with flowers, and perfumed with oil of 

benjamin. Civet is also in repute, but more used by the men. To 

render their skin fine, smooth, and soft they make use of a white 

cosmetic called _poopoor_ [a mixture of ginger, patch-leaf, 

maize, sandal-wood, fairy-cotton, and mush-seed with a basis of 

fine rice]." (W. Marsden, _History of Sumatra_, 1783, p. 230.) 

 

The Alfurus of Seram in the Moluccas, who have not yet been 

spoilt by foreign influences, are very fond of music and dancing. 

Their _maku_ dances, which take place at night, have been 

described by Joest: "Great torches of dry bamboos and piles of 

burning resinous leaves light up the giant trees to their very 

summits and reveal in the distance the little huts which the 

Alfuras have built in the virgin forests, as well as the skulls 

of the slain. The women squat together by the fire, making a 

deafening noise with the gongs and the drums, while the young 

girls, richly adorned with pearls and fragrant flowers, await the 

beginning of the dance. Then appear the men and youths without 

weapons, but in full war-costume, the girdle freshly marked with 

the number of slain enemies. [Among the Alfuras it is the man who 

has the largest number of heads to show who has most chance of 

winning the object of his love.] They hold each other's arms and 

form a circle, which is not, however, completely closed. A song 

is started, and with small, slow steps this ring of bodies, like 

a winding snake, moves sideways, backward, closes, opens again, 

the steps become heavier, the songs and drums louder, the girls 

enter the circle and with closed eyes grasp the girdle of their 

chosen youths, who clasp them by the hips and necks, the chain 

becomes longer and longer, the dance and song more ardent, until 


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