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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

good dancer would find favor in the sight of the girls. This can 

be readily understood by anyone who has seen the active, skilful, 

and fatiguing dances of these people. A young man who could 

acquit himself well in these dances must be possessed of no mean 

strength and agility, qualities which everywhere appeal to the 

opposite sex. Further, he was decorated, according to local 

custom, with all that would render him more imposing in the eyes 

of the spectators. As the former chief of Mabuiag put it, 'In 

England if a man has plenty of money, women want to marry him; so 

here, if a man dances well they too want him.' In olden days the 

war-dance, which was performed after a successful foray, would be 

the most powerful excitement to a marriageable girl, especially 

if a young man had distinguished himself sufficiently to bring 

home the head of someone he had killed." 

 

Among the tribes inhabiting the mouth of the Wanigela River, New 

Guinea, "when a boy admires a girl, he will not look at her, 

speak to her, or go near her. He, however, shows his love by 

athletic bounds, posing, and pursuit, and by the spearing of 

imaginary enemies, etc., before her, to attract her attention. If 

the girl reciprocates his love she will employ a small girl to 

give to him an _ugauga gauna_, or love invitation, consisting of 

an areca-nut whose skin has been marked with different designs, 

significant of her wish to _ugauga_. After dark he is apprised of 

the place where the girl awaits him; repairing thither, he seats 

himself beside her as close as possible, and they mutually share 

in the consumption of the betel-nut." This constitutes betrothal; 

henceforth he is free to visit the girl's house and sleep there. 

Marriages usually take place at the most important festival of 

the year, the _kapa_, preparations for which are made during the 

three previous months, so that there may be a bountiful and 

unfailing supply of bananas. Much dancing takes place among the 

unmarried girls, who, also, are tattooed at this time over the 

whole of the front of the body, special attention being paid to 

the lower parts, as a girl who is not properly tattooed there 

possesses no attraction in the eyes of young men. Married women 

and widows and divorced women are not forbidden to take part in 

these dances, but it would be considered ridiculous for them to 

do so. (R.E. Guise, "On the Tribes of the Wanigela River," 

_Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, new series, vol. i, 

1899, pp. 209, 214 et seq.) 

 

In the island of Nias in the Malay Archipelago, Modigliani 

(mainly on the excellent authority of Sundermann, the missionary) 

states, at a wedding "dancing and singing go on throughout the 

day. The women, two or three at a time, a little apart from the 

men, take part in the dancing, which is very well adapted to 

emphasize the curves of the flanks and the breasts, though at the 

same time the defects of their legs are exhibited in this series 

of rhythmic contortions which constitute a Nias dance. The most 

graceful movement they execute is a lascivious undulation of the 

flanks while the face and breast are slowly wound round by the 

_sarong_ [a sort of skirt] held in the hands, and then again 

revealed. These movements are executed with jerks of the wrist 

and contortions of the flanks, not always graceful, but which 

excite the admiration of the spectators, even of the women, who 

form in groups to sing in chorus a compliment, more or less 

sincere, in which they say: 'They dance with the grace of birds 

when they fly. They dance as the hawk flies; it is lovely to 

see.' They sing and dance both at weddings and at other 

festivals." (Elio Modigliani, _Un Viaggio a Nias_, 1890, p. 549.) 

 

 


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