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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

these festivals clearly indicates that sexual intercourse is a 

recognized and probably essential element in the ceremonies. This 

is further emphasized by the fact that at other festivals open 

sexual intercourse is not allowed. Thus, at the Mindarie, or 

dance at a peace festival (when a number of tribes comes 

together), "there is great rejoicing at the coming festival, 

which is generally held at the full of the moon, and kept up all 

night. The men are artistically decorated with down and feathers, 

with all kinds of designs. The down and feathers are stuck on 

their bodies with blood freshly taken from their penis; they are 

also nicely painted with various colors; tufts of boughs are tied 

on their ankles to make a noise while dancing. Promiscuous sexual 

intercourse is carried on _secretly_; many quarrels occur at this 

time." (_Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, vol. xxiv, 

November, 1894, p. 174.) 

In Australian dances, sometimes men and women dance together, 

sometimes the men dance alone, sometimes the women. In one dance 

described by Eyre: "Women are the chief performers; their bodies 

are painted with white streaks, and their hair adorned with 

cockatoo feathers. They carry large sticks in their hands, and 

place themselves in a row in front, while the men with their 

spears stand in a row behind them. They then all commence their 

movements, but without intermingling, the males and females 

dancing by themselves. The women have occasionally another mode 

of dancing, by joining the hands together over the head, closing 

the feet, and bringing the knees into contact. The legs are then 

thrown outward from the knee, while the feet and hands are kept 

in their original position, and, being drawn quickly in again, a 

sharp sound is produced by the collision. This is also practised 

alone by young girls or by several together for their own 

amusement. It is adopted also when a single woman is placed in 

front of a row of male dancers to excite their passions." (E.J. 

Eyre, _Journals of Expeditions into Central Australia_, vol. ii, 

p. 235.) 

 

A charming Australian folk-tale concerning two sisters with 

wings, who disliked men, and their wooing by a man, clearly 

indicates, even among the Australians (whose love-making is 

commonly supposed to be somewhat brutal in character), the 

consciousness that it is by his beauty, charm, and skill in 

courtship that a man wins a woman. Unahanach, the lover, stole 

unperceived to the river where the girls were bathing and at last 

showed himself carelessly sitting on a high tree. The girls were 

startled, but thought it would be safe to amuse themselves by 

looking at the intruder. "Young and with the most active figure, 

yet of a strength that defied the strongest emu, and even enabled 

him to resist an 'old man' kangaroo, he had no equal in the 

chase, and conscious power gave a dignity to his expression that 

at one glance calmed the fears of the two girls. His large 

brilliant eyes, shaded by a deep fringe of soft black eyelashes, 

gazed down upon them admiringly, and his rich black hair hung 

around his well-formed face, smooth and shining from the emu-oil 

with which it was abundantly covered." At last he persuaded them 

to talk and by and by induced them to call him husband. Then they 

went off with him, with no thought of flight in their hearts. 

("Australian Folklore Stories," collected by W. Dunlop, _Journal 

of the Anthropological Institute_, new series, vol. i, 1898, p. 

33.) 

 

Of the people of Torres Straits Haddon states (_Reports 

Anthropological Expedition to Torres Straits_, vol. v, p. 222): 

"It was during the secular dance, or _Kap_, that the girls 

usually lost their hearts to the young men. A young man who was a 


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