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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

that means, and carries himself with even greater dignity than 

before. In the end, however, he must give in. As a last appeal, 

one of his lady lovers may coyly lower herself in the water till 

only the top of her back, head, and neck is seen, and so 

fascinating an advance as this no drake of any sensibility can 

withstand." 

 

The courting of the Argus pheasant, noted for the extreme beauty 

of the male's plumage, was observed by H.O. Forbes in Sumatra. It 

is the habit of this bird to make "a large circus, some ten or 

twelve feet in diameter, in the forest, which it clears of every 

leaf and twig and branch, till the ground is perfectly swept and 

garnished. On the margin of this circus there is invariably a 

projecting branch or high-arched root, at a few feet elevation 

above the ground, on which the female bird takes its place, while 

in the ring the male--the male birds alone possess great 

decoration--shows off all its magnificence for the gratification 

and pleasure of his consort and to exalt himself in her eyes." 

(H.O. Forbes, _A. Naturalist's Wanderings_, 1885, p. 131.) 

 

"All ostriches, adults as well as chicks, have a strange habit 

known as 'waltzing.' After running for a few hundred yards they 

will also stop, and, with raised wings, spin around rapidly for 

some time after until quite giddy, when a broken leg occasionally 

occurs.... Vicious cocks 'roll' when challenging to fight or when 

wooing the hen. The cock will suddenly bump down on to his knees 

(the ankle-joint), open his wings, and then swing them 

alternately backward and forward, as if on a pivot.... While 

rolling, every feather over the whole body is on end, and the 

plumes are open, like a large white fan. At such a time the bird 

sees very imperfectly, if at all; in fact, he seems so 

preoccupied that, if pursued, one may often approach unnoticed. 

Just before rolling, a cock, especially if courting the hen, will 

often run slowly and daintily on the points of his toes, with 

neck slightly inflated, upright, and rigid, the tail 

half-drooped, and all his body-feathers fluffed up; the wings 

raised and expanded, the inside edges touching the sides of the 

neck for nearly the whole of its length, and the plumes showing 

separately, like an open fan. In no other attitude is the 

splendid beauty of his plumage displayed to such advantage." 

(S.C. Cronwright Schreiner, "The Ostrich," _Zooelogist_, March, 

1897.) 

 

As may be seen from the foregoing fairly typical examples, the 

phenomena of courtship are highly developed, and have been most 

carefully studied, in animals outside the mammal series. It may 

seem a long leap from birds to man; yet, as will be seen, the 

phenomena among primitive human peoples, if not, indeed, among 

many civilized peoples also, closely resemble those found among 

birds, though, unfortunately, they have not usually been so 

carefully studied. 

 

In Australia, where dancing is carried to a high pitch of 

elaboration, its association with the sexual impulse is close and 

unmistakable. Thus, Mr. Samuel Gason (of whom it has been said 

that "no man living has been more among blacks or knows more of 

their ways") remarks concerning a dance of the Dieyerie tribe: 

"This dance men and women only take part in, in regular form and 

position, keeping splendid time to the rattle of the beat of two 

boomerangs; some of the women keep time by clapping their hands 

between their thighs; promiscuous sexual intercourse follows 

after the dance; jealousy is forbidden." Again, at the Mobierrie, 

or rat-harvest, "many weeks' preparation before the dance comes 

off; no quarreling is allowed; promiscuous sexual intercourse 

during the ceremony." The fact that jealousy is forbidden at 


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