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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Of a tyrant-bird (_Pitangus Bolivianus_) Hudson writes 

(_Argentine Ornithology_, vol. i, p. 148): "Though the male and 

female are greatly attached, they do not go afield to hunt in 

company, but separate to meet again at intervals during the day. 

One of a couple (say, the female) returns to the trees where they 

are accustomed to meet, and after a time, becoming impatient or 

anxious at the delay of her consort, utters a very long, clear 

call-note. He is perhaps a quarter of a mile away, watching for a 

frog beside a pool, or beating over a thistle-bed, but he hears 

the note and presently responds with one of equal power. Then, 

perhaps, for half an hour, at intervals of half a minute, the 

birds answer each other, though the powerful call of the one must 

interfere with his hunting. At length he returns; then the two 

birds, perched close together, with their yellow bosoms almost 

touching, crests elevated, and beating the branch with their 

wings, scream their loudest notes in concert--a confused jubilant 

noise that rings through the whole plantation. Their joy at 

meeting is patent, and their action corresponds to the warm 

embrace of a loving human couple." 

 

Of the red-breasted marsh-bird (_Leistes superciliaris_) Hudson 

(_Argentine Ornithology_, vol. i, p. 100) writes: "These birds 

are migratory, and appear everywhere in the eastern part of the 

Argentine country early in October, arriving singly, after which 

each male takes up a position in a field or open space abounding 

with coarse grass and herbage, where he spends most of his time 

perched on the summit of a tall stalk or weed, his glowing 

crimson bosom showing at a distance like some splendid flower 

above the herbage. At intervals of two or three minutes he soars 

vertically up to a height of twenty or twenty-five yards to utter 

his song, composed of a single long, powerful and rather musical 

note, ending with an attempt at a flourish, during which the bird 

flutters and turns about in the air; then, as if discouraged at 

his failure, he drops down, emitting harsh, guttural chirps, to 

resume his stand. Meanwhile the female is invisible, keeping 

closely concealed under the long grass. But at length, attracted 

perhaps by the bright bosom and aerial music of the male, she 

occasionally exhibits herself for a few moments, starting up with 

a wild zigzag flight, and, darting this way and that, presently 

drops into the grass once more. The moment she appears above the 

grass the male gives chase, and they vanish from sight together." 

 

 

"Courtship with the mallard," says J.G. Millais (_Natural History 

of British Ducks_, p. 6), "appears to be carried on by both 

sexes, though generally three or four drakes are seen showing 

themselves off to attract the attention of a single duck. 

Swimming round her, in a coy and semi-self-conscious manner, they 

now and again all stop quite still, nod, bow, and throw their 

necks out in token of their admiration and their desire of a 

favorable response. But the most interesting display is when all 

the drakes simultaneously stand up in the water and rapidly pass 

their bills down their breasts, uttering at the same time a low 

single note somewhat like the first half of the call that teal 

and pintail make when 'showing off.' At other times the 

love-making of the drake seems to be rather passive than active. 

While graciously allowing himself to be courted, he holds his 

head high with conscious pride, and accepts as a matter of course 

any attention that may be paid to him. A proud bird is he when 

three or four ducks come swimming along beside and around him, 

uttering a curious guttural note, and at the same time dipping 

their bills in quick succession to right and left. He knows what 


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