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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

more bubbles somewhat spirally. The posterior end of the balloon 

is left more or less open. The purpose of this structure is to 

attract the female. When numerous males were flying up and down 

the road, it happened several times that a female was seen to 

approach them from some choke-cherry blossoms near by. The males 

immediately gathered in her path, and she with little hesitation 

selected for a mate the one with the largest balloon, taking a 

position _upon his back_. After copulation had begun, the pair 

would settle down toward the ground, select a quiet spot, and the 

female would alight by placing her front legs across a horizontal 

grass blade, her head resting against the blade so as to brace 

the body in position. Here she would continue to hold the male 

beneath her for a little time, until the process was finished. 

The male, meanwhile, would be rolling the balloon about in a 

variety of positions, juggling with it, one might almost say. 

After the male and female parted company, the male immediately 

dropped the balloon upon the ground, and it was greedily seized 

by ants. No illustration could properly show the beauty of the 

balloon." (Aldrich and Turley, "A Balloon-making Fly," _American 

Naturalist_, October, 1899.) 

 

"In many species of moths the males 'assemble' around the freshly 

emerged female, but no special advantage appears to attend on 

early arrival. The female sits apparently motionless, while the 

little crowd of suitors buzz around her for several minutes. 

Suddenly, and, as far as one can see, without any sign from the 

female, one of the males pairs with her and all the others 

immediately disappear. In these cases the males do not fight or 

struggle in any way, and as one watches the ceremony the wonder 

arises as to how the moment is determined, and why the pairing 

did not take place before. Proximity does not decide the point, 

for long beforehand the males often alight close to the female 

and brush against her with fluttering wings. I have watched the 

process exactly as I have described it in a common Northern 

_Noctua_, the antler moth (_Charaeax graminis_), and I have seen 

the same thing among beetles." (E.B. Poulton, _The Colors of 

Animals_, 1890, p. 391.) This author mentions that among some 

butterflies the females take the active part. The example here 

quoted of courtship among moths illustrates how phenomena which 

are with difficulty explicable by the theory of sexual selection 

in its original form become at once intelligible when we realize 

the importance of tumescence in courtship. 

 

Of the Argentine cow-bird (_Molothrus bonariensis_) Hudson says 

(_Argentine Ornithology_, vol. i, p. 73): "The song of the male, 

particularly when making love, is accompanied with gestures and 

actions somewhat like those of the domestic pigeon. He swells 

himself out, beating the ground with his wings, and uttering a 

series of deep internal notes, followed by others loud and clear; 

and occasionally, when uttering them, he suddenly takes wing and 

flies directly away from the female to a distance of fifty yards, 

and performs a wide circuit about her in the air, singing all the 

time. The homely object of his passion always appears utterly 

indifferent to this curious and pretty performance; yet she must 

be even more impressionable than most female birds, since she 

continues scattering about her parasitical and often wasted eggs 

during four months in every year." 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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