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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Even in the hermaphroditic slugs (_Limax maximus_) the process of 

courtship is slow and elaborate. It has been described by James 

Bladon ("The Loves of the Slug [_Limax cinereus_]," _Zooelogist_, 

vol. xv, 1857, p. 6272). It begins toward midnight on sultry 

summer nights, one slug slowly following another, resting its 

mouth on what may be called the tail of the first, and following 

its every movement. Finally they stop and begin crawling around 

each other, emitting large quantities of mucus. When this has 

constituted a mass of sufficient size and consistence they 

suspend themselves from it by a cord of mucus from nine to 

fifteen inches in length, continuing to turn round each other 

till their bodies form a cone. Then the organs of generation are 

protruded from their orifice near the mouth and, hanging down a 

short distance, touch each other. They also then begin again the 

same spiral motion, twisting around each other, like a two-strand 

cord, assuming various and beautiful forms, sometimes like an 

inverted agaric, or a foliated murex, or a leaf of curled 

parsley, the light falling on the ever-varying surface of the 

generative organs sometimes producing iridescence. It is not 

until after a considerable time that the organs untwist and are 

withdrawn and the bodies separate, to crawl up the suspending 

cord and depart. 

 

Some snails have a special organ for creating sexual excitement. 

A remarkable part of the reproductive system in many of the true 

Helicidae is the so-called _dart, Liebespfeil_, or _telum 

Veneris_. It consists of a straight or curved, sometimes 

slightly twisted, tubular shaft of carbonate of lime, tapering to 

a fine point above, and enlarging gradually, more often somewhat 

abruptly, to the base. The sides of the shaft are sometimes 

furnished with two or more blades; these are apparently not for 

cutting purposes, but simply to brace the stem. The dart is 

contained in a dart-sac, which is attached as a sort of pocket to 

the vagina, at no great distance from its orifice. In _Helix 

aspersa_ the dart is about five-sixteenths of an inch in length, 

and one-eighth of an inch in breadth at its base. It appears most 

probable that the dart is employed as an adjunct for the sexual 

act. Besides the fact of the position of the dart-sac 

anatomically, we find that the darts are extended and become 

imbedded in the flesh, just before or during the act of 

copulation. It may be regarded, then, as an organ whose functions 

induce excitement preparatory to sexual union. It only occurs in 

well-grown specimens. (Rev. L.H. Cooke, "Molluscs," _Cambridge 

Natural History_, vol. iii, p. 143.) 

 

Racovitza has shown that in the octopus (_Octopus vulgaris_) 

courtship is carried on with considerable delicacy, and not 

brutally, as had previously been supposed. The male gently 

stretches out his third arm on the right and caresses the female 

with its extremity, eventually passing it into the chamber formed 

by the mantle. The female contracts spasmodically, but does not 

attempt to move. They remain thus about an hour or more, and 

during this time the male shifts the arm from one oviduct to the 

other. Finally he withdraws his arm, caresses her with it for a 

few moments, and then replaces it with his other arm. (E.G. 

Racovitza, in _Archives de Zooelogie Experimentale_, quoted in 

_Natural Science_, November, 1894.) 

 

 

The phenomena of courtship are very well illustrated by spiders. 

Peckham, who has carefully studied them, tells us of _Saitis 

pulex_: "On May 24th we found a mature female, and placed her in 

one of the larger boxes, and the next day we put a male in with 

her. He saw her as she stood perfectly still, twelve inches away; 

the glance seemed to excite him, and he at once moved toward her; 


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