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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

race, may most easily overcome. In this connection we may note what Marro 

has said in another connection, when attempting to answer the question why 

it is that among savages courtship becomes so often a matter in which 

persuasion takes the form of force. The explanation, he remarks, is yet 

very simple. Force is the foundation of virility, and its psychic 

manifestation is courage. In the struggle for life violence is the first 

virtue. The modesty of women--in its primordial form consisting in 

physical resistance, active or passive, to the assaults of the male--aided 

selection by putting to the test man's most important quality, force. Thus 

it is that when choosing among rivals for her favors a woman attributes 

value to violence.[31] Marro thus independently confirms the result 

reached by Groos. 

 

The debate which has for so many years been proceeding concerning the 

validity of the theory of sexual selection may now be said to be brought 

to an end. Those who supported Darwin and those who opposed him were, both 

alike, in part right and in part wrong, and it is now possible to combine 

the elements of truth on either side into a coherent whole. This is now 

beginning to be widely recognized; Lloyd Morgan,[32] for instance, has 

readjusted his position as regards the "pairing instinct" in the light of 

Groos's contribution to the subject. "The hypothesis of sexual selection," 

he concludes, "suggests that the accepted male is the one which adequately 

evokes the pairing impulse.... Courtship may thus be regarded from the 

physiological point of view as a means of producing the requisite amount 

of pairing hunger; of stimulating the whole system and facilitating 

general and special vascular changes; of creating that state of profound 

and explosive irritability which has for its psychological concomitant or 

antecedent an imperious and irresistible craving.... Courtship is thus 

the strong and steady bending of the bow that the arrow may find its mark 

in a biological end of the highest importance in the survival of a healthy 

and vigorous race." 

 

Having thus viewed the matter broadly, we may consider in detail 

a few examples of the process of tumescence among the lower 

animals and man, for, as will be seen, the process in both is 

identical. As regards animal courtship, the best treasury of 

facts is Brehm's _Thierleben_, while Buechner's _Liebe und 

Liebes-Leben in der Thierwelt_ is a useful summary; the admirable 

discussion of bird-dancing and other forms of courtship in 

Haecker's _Gesang der Voegel_, chapter iv, may also be consulted. 

As regards man, Wallaschek's _Primitive Music_, chapter vii, 

brings together much scattered material, and is all the more 

valuable since the author rejects any form of sexual selection; 

Hirn's _Origins of Art_, chapter xvii, is well worth reading, and 

Finck's _Primitive Love and Love-stories_ contains a large amount 

of miscellaneous information. I have preferred not to draw on any 

of these easily accessible sources (except that in one or two 

cases I have utilized references they supplied), but here simply 

furnish illustrations met with in the course of my own reading. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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