Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

primarily sexual and intimately connected with the process of 

tumescence in both sexes. It is noteworthy that, according to 

H.E. Howard ("On Sexual Selection in Birds," _Zooelogist_, Nov., 

1903), color is most developed just before pairing, rapidly 

becoming less beautiful--even within a few hours--after this, and 

the most beautiful male is most successful in getting paired. The 

fact that, as Mr. Hudson himself points out, it is at the season 

of love that these manifestations mainly, if not exclusively, 

appear, and that it is the more brilliant and highly endowed 

males which play the chief part in them, only serves to confirm 

such a conclusion. To argue, with Mr. Hudson, that they cannot be 

sexual because they sometimes occur before the arrival of the 

females, is much the same as to argue that the antics of a 

kitten with a feather or a reel have no relationship whatever to 

mice. The birds that began earliest to practise their 

accomplishments would probably have most chance of success when 

the females arrived. Darwin himself said that nothing is commoner 

than for animals to take pleasure in practising whatever instinct 

they follow at other times for some real good. These 

manifestations are primarily for the sake of producing sexual 

tumescence, and could not well have been developed to the height 

they have reached unless they were connected closely with 

propagation. That they may incidentally serve to express 

"gladness" one need not feel called upon to question. 

 

Another observer of birds, Mr. E. Selous, has made observations 

which are of interest in this connection. He finds that all 

bird-dances are not nuptial, but that some birds--the 

stone-curlew (or great plover), for example--have different kinds 

of dances. Among these birds he has made the observation, very 

significant from our present point of view, that the nuptial 

dances, taken part in by both of the pair, are immediately 

followed by intercourse. In spring "all such runnings and 

chasings are, at this time, but a part of the business of 

pairing, and one divines at once that such attitudes are of a 

sexual character.... Here we have a bird with distinct nuptial 

(sexual) and social (non-sexual) forms of display or antics, and 

the former as well as the latter are equally indulged in by both 

sexes." (E. Selous, _Bird Watching_, pp. 15-20.) 

 

The same author (ibid., pp. 79, 94) argues that in the fights of 

two males for one female--with violent emotion on one side and 

interested curiosity on the other--the attitude of the former 

"might gradually come to be a display made entirely for the 

female, and of the latter a greater or less degree of pleasurable 

excitement raised by it, with a choice in accordance." On this 

view the interest of the female would first have been directed, 

not to the plumage, but to the frenzied actions and antics of the 

male. From these antics in undecorated birds would gradually 

develop the interest in waving plumes and fluttering wings. Such 

a dance might come to be of a quite formal and non-courting 

nature. 

 

Last, we owe to Professor Haecker what may fairly be regarded, in 

all main outlines, as an almost final statement of the matter. In 

his _Gesang der Voegel_ (1900) he gives a very clear account of 

the evolution of bird-song, which he regards as the most 

essential element in all this group of manifestations, furnishing 

the key also to the dancing and other antics. Originally the song 

consists only of call-cries and recognition-notes. Under the 

parallel influence of natural selection and sexual selection they 

become at the pairing season reflexes of excitement and thus 

develop into methods of producing excitement, in the male by the 

muscular energy required, and in the female through the ear; 


Page 2 from 4:  Back   1  [2]  3   4   Forward