Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

'erudite and cold' sort of obscenity in this way. 

 

"All this, of course, is only one half, and by no means always 

the dominant half, of his nature. He was often repentant for 

these delinquencies, and he was sincerely religious. He was also 

fond of serious learning and contrived to take a first-class 

university degree. Yet, ever and anon, the deeply sensual side of 

his nature made itself felt. Scotched for a time it could be, but 

killed never. 

 

"Yet, I do not think it could be said that he had the sexual 

instinct in any really high degree. It was more like a small fly 

that makes a large buzz than any considerable factor in his 

constitution. He had a companion about this time of whom such a 

remark is even more true. This man's mind was replete with all 

manner of risky stories, all sorts of sexual details. He would 

take long walks with girls of loose character, talk with 

prostitutes at home and abroad, and yet, I believe, he never 

proceeded to coitus. 

 

"Such then, was the subject of this notice up to the time of his 

marriage. Two men, one might say, in one skin. One learned, one 

merely obscene; one a pattern of decorousness, the other a 

self-polluter. 

 

"On the sexual side he was as one knowing everything there is to 

know--yet knowing nothing. Like the boy-hero in Wedekind's 

_Fruehling's Erwachen_, he had been long in Egypt, yet he had 

never seen the pyramids. He began to distress himself with 

questions as to whether he was yet capable; whether his recurring 

vice had not permanently injured him; whether he had made himself 

unfit for marriage. So shy and reserved was he about his secret 

that he could never have brought himself to mention it to a 

medical man. 'What! he! the good, the religious! the wholly moral 

and decorous!' (such was, indeed, the reputation he had among his 

friends); 'he, the victim of a vice so black!' No, no! '_Secretum 

meum mihi_,' he cried. 

 

"Fortune, however, was kind to him. He was at an early age free 

from financial worries, which had almost crushed him earlier in 

his career, and he met in course of time the family from which he 

selected his excellent wife. 

 

"The society in which he lived was of all English classes, I 

should suppose, the most reticent in matters of sex--the 

respectable, lower middle class; shopkeepers and the like, with a 

tradition of homely religion and virtue. The classes a little 

higher in the scale (to which, by the way, his mother had 

belonged) could far better sympathize with one in his position. 

Well, the family of his future wife was of a higher class and, 

what is far more, of foreign origin, for whom a large number of 

our English 'convenances' do not exist. To them sex was frankly 

recognized as a factor in life, and the mother of this household, 

as he grew more intimate, broached subjects which he had never, 

in such a manner, discussed before. It is unnecessary to give 

here any general history of his relationships with this 

household, as they have nothing to do with the matter in hand. 

After some time he became engaged to the youngest daughter, two 

years his senior, a woman of remarkable beauty and splendid 

development, one who attracted him as none other had done, both 

on account of her intellectual and social qualities and her 

physical beauty (he had hitherto despaired of finding the two 

combined in one person), for she is certainly the most beautiful 

woman with whom he has ever been acquainted. 

 

"He now began to make the practical acquaintance of a woman--and 

one who, in impulses, temper, manner, and habit of thought, 

differed _toto caelo_ from the girls he had known in his old home. 

Her sexual nature was ripe and developed, and it is lucky that 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward