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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

lying sleepless at night--when the monks prayed 'ne polluantur 

corpora'--did its attacks come insidiously upon him. He would 

struggle for weeks and then would come a relapse. On one occasion 

he slept with a young uncle who amused himself, thinking he was 

asleep, by playing with his penis until he had an emission. A.N. 

hailed the occasion with keen joy--he caustically argued that he 

experienced the pleasure without being culpable in its 

production! Then on 'coming to himself' he would agonize over his 

vice, remembering, for example, that, while _he_ had rejoiced in 

what had been done, the very cousin who some time before used to 

share his sin was genuinely annoyed at the same uncle's 

attentions when it was he who suffered them. 

 

"Looking back over the whole period of his youth and adolescence, 

he can trace the psychological effect of what was going on 

secretly, in his relations to girls and women. In a word, these 

relations were sentimental only. He often imagined himself in 

love; but it was imagination only. He was in love with a wraith, 

not a girl of flesh and blood. He hesitated to regard in any 

sexual way any girl of whom he had a high opinion; sexual desire 

and 'love' seemed for him to inhabit different worlds and that it 

would be a pollution to bring them together. In hours of 

relaxation from the very hard intellectual work which he was at 

this time engaged on at school and at the university, he was 

quite content with the society of quite young girls or even 

children when most of his friends would have sought out females 

of their own age. Nothing could have been farther from his 

desires or intention than any lascivious or, indeed, unseemly act 

toward any female in whose company he might be: no mother need 

have hesitated to trust her daughter in his company. I firmly 

believe that the discipline of the same bed which Gibbon 

(_Decline and Fall_, ed. Bury, vol. ii, p. 37) makes so merry 

over could have been endured by him without difficulty. His 

outward conduct was in all these respects most seemly and 

decorous, yet night after night he could masturbate, his 

imagination glowing with visions of female nakedness. 

 

"Curiously the one and only actual female for whom he felt any 

desire at the earlier period (aged 14 to 16) began to be the 

cousin who lived in the house. On one occasion he touched her 

breasts, on another her naked thighs--and that was all! As she 

grew to puberty, she would have allowed far more liberties, but 

he contented himself with a sly glance now and again, when he 

could procure it, at her swelling bosom. The fear of putting her 

with child was ample to keep him away from her bed. Later on even 

so much as the foregoing occurred no more, and, as I have said, 

his outward life became absolutely decorous. 

 

"Consequently he was in no danger of having dealings with 

prostitutes. The preliminaries, the conversation of such women, 

especially their drinking habits, would have been disgusting and 

repugnant to him in the extreme. He would have shunned the 

possibility of acquiring venereal disease like the plague. But he 

was never free from solitary vice; he secretly envied those who 

had occasions for coitus in what I may call a seemly and cleanly 

manner, friends in the country with farm girls, etc., of whom he 

had heard. He indulged also in lascivious reading, the obscene 

when he could procure it, rather than the merely suggestive, 

which has never been to his taste. He was familiar with quite a 

large number of Latin and Greek indecent passages, knew the 

broader farces of the _Canterbury Tales_ and of the _Decameron_, 

and, later, the 'contes' of La Fontaine and the _Facetiae_ of 

Poggio. As Ste.-Beuve says of Gibbon, I think, he acquired an 


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