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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

analyze it carefully. 

 

"I may summarize my own feelings thus: First, exciting ideas 

alone produce, as a rule, merely the first stage of sexual 

excitement. Second, the same ideas connected with a particular 

person will produce the second stage. Third, the same may be said 

of the presence of the beloved person. Fourth, actual contact 

appears necessary for the third stage. If the first stage only be 

reached, the sensation is not pleasurable in reality, or would 

not be but for its association. If produced, as I have sometimes 

found it to be, by a sense of mental incapacity, it is distinctly 

disagreeable, especially if one feels that the energy which might 

have been used in coping with the difficulty is being thus 

dissipated. If it be produced, as it may be, as the result of 

physical or mental restraint, it is also unpleasant unless the 

restraint were put upon one by a person one loves. Then, however, 

the second stage would probably be reached, but this would depend 

a good deal on one's mood. If the first stage only were reached, 

I think it would be disagreeable; it would mean a conflict 

between one's will and sexual feeling. Perhaps women who feel 

actual repugnance to the sexual act with a man they love have 

never gone beyond the first stage, when their dislike to it would 

be quite intelligible to me. 

 

"Some time after the life in Italy had come to an end I became 

engaged. There was considerable difficulty in the way of 

marriage, but we saw a good deal of each other. My _fiance_ often 

dined with us, and we met every day. The result of seeing him so 

frequently was that I was kept in a constant state of strong, but 

suppressed, sexual excitement. This was particularly the case 

when we met in the evening and wandered about the moonlit garden 

together. When this had gone on about three months I began to 

experience a sense of discomfort after each of his visits. The 

abdomen seemed to swell with a feeling of fullness and 

congestion; but, though these sensations were closely connected 

with the physical excitement, they were not sufficiently painful 

to cause me any alarm or make me endeavor to avoid their 

pleasurable cause. The symptoms got worse, however, and no longer 

passed off quickly as at first. The swelling increased; 

considerable pain and a dragged-down sensation resulted the 

moment I tried to walk even a short distance. I was troubled 

with constant indigestion, weight in the chest, pain in the head 

and eyes, and continual slight diarrhea. This went on for about 

nine months, and then my _fiance_ was called away from the 

neighborhood. After his departure I got a trifle better, but the 

symptoms remained, though in less acute form. A few months later 

the engagement was broken off, and for some weeks I was severely 

ill with influenza and was on my back for several weeks. When I 

could get about a little, though very weak, all the swelling was 

gone, but pain returned whenever I tried to walk or stand for 

long. The indigestion and diarrhea were also very troublesome. I 

was treated for both by a physician, but without success. Next 

year I became engaged to my husband and was shortly after 

married. The indigestion and diarrhea disappeared soon after. The 

pain and dragging feeling in the abdomen bothered me much in 

walking or any kind of exercise. One day I came across a medical 

work, _The Elements of Social Science_, in which I found 

descriptions of symptoms like those I suffered from ascribed to 

uterine disease. I again applied to a doctor, telling him I 

thought there was displacement and possibly congestion. He 

confirmed my opinion and told me to wear a pessary. He ascribed 

the displacement to the relaxing climate, and said he did not 


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