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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

staying in towns, where they can obtain prostitutes, they will remain 

continent until they return home again, a period of perhaps a month." 

 

[207] Schellong, _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1889, i, pp. 17, 19; 

Haddon, _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, February, 1890, pp. 

316, 397; Guise, ib., February and May, 1899, p. 207; Seligmann, ib., 

1902, pp. 298, 301-302; _Reports Cambridge Expedition_, vol. v, pp. 

199-200, 275. 

 

[208] _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1900, ht. v, p. 414. 

 

[209] R. Brough Smyth, _The Aborigines of Victoria_, vol. ii, p. 318. 

 

[210] _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 1894, pp. 170, 177, 187. 

 

[211] _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1896, iv, pp. 180-181. 

 

[212] W.W. Skeat, _Malay Magic_, p. 524. 

 

[213] W.F. Daniell, _Medical Topography of Gulf of Guinea_, 1849, p. 55. 

 

[214] Sir H.H. Johnston, _British Central Africa_, 1899, pp. 409, 414. 

 

[215] Rev. J.H. Weeks, _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 1910, 

p. 418. 

 

[216] Sir A.B. Ellis, _Yoruba-Speaking Peoples_, p. 185. 

 

[217] W.F. Daniell, op. cit., p. 36. 

 

[218] _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, August and November, 

1898, p. 106. 

 

[219] _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1899, ii and iii, p. 84; Velten, 

_Sitten und Gebraueche der Suaheli_, p. 12. 

 

[220] _Zeitschrift fuer Ethnologie_, 1896, p. 364. 

 

[221] Vambery, _Travels in Central Asia_, 1864, p. 323. 

 

[222] Heard, _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, Jan.-June, 1911, 

p. 210. The same rule is also observed by the Christians of this district. 

 

[223] Haddon and Stubbs, _Councils and Ecclesiastical Documents_, vol. 

iii, p. 423. 

 

[224] Jeremy Taylor, _The Rule of Conscience_, bk. iii, ch. iv, rule xx. 

 

 

III. 

 

 

Thus it would seem probable that, contrary to a belief once widely 

prevalent, the sexual instinct has increased rather than diminished with 

the growth of civilization. This fact was clear to the insight of 

Lucretius, though it has often been lost sight of since.[225] Yet even 

observation of animals might have suggested the real bearing of the facts. 

The higher breeds of cattle, it is said, require the male more often than 

the inferior breeds.[226] Thorough-bred horses soon reach sexual maturity, 

and I understand that since pains have been taken to improve cart-horses 

the sexual instincts of the mares have become less trustworthy. There is 

certainly no doubt that in our domestic animals generally, which live 

under what may be called civilized conditions, the sexual system and the 

sexual needs are more developed than in the wild species most closely 

related to them.[227] All observers seem to agree on this point, and it is 

sufficient to refer to the excellent summary of the question furnished by 

Heape in the study of "The 'Sexual Season' of Mammals," to which reference 

has already been made. He remarks, moreover, that, "while the sexual 

activity of domestic animals and of wild animals in captivity may be more 

frequently exhibited, it is not so violent as is shown by animals in the 

wild state."[228] So that, it would seem, the greater periodicity of the 

instinct in the wild state, alike in animals and in man, is associated 

with greater violence of the manifestations when they do appear. Certain 

rodents, such as the rat and the mouse, are well known to possess both 

great reproductive power and marked sexual proclivities. Heape suggests 

that this also is "due to the advantages derived from their intimate 

relations with the luxuries of civilization." Heape recognizes that, as 

regards reproductive power, the same development may be traced in man: "It 

would seem highly probable that the reproductive power of man has 

increased with civilization, precisely as it may be increased in the lower 

animals by domestication; that the effect of a regular supply of good 

food, together with all the other stimulating factors available and 

exercised in modern civilized communities, has resulted in such great 


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