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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

abstinence, already consecrated by primitive magic and religion, and 

embodied it in their system. It was so in ancient Egypt. Thus, according 

to Diodorus, on the death of a king, the entire population of Egypt 

abstained from sexual intercourse for seventy-two days. The Persians, 

again, attached great value to sexual as to all other kinds of purity. 

Even involuntary seminal emissions were severely punishable. To lie with a 

menstruating woman, according to the _Vendidad_, was as serious a matter 

as to pollute holy fire, and to lie with a pregnant woman was to incur a 

penalty of 2000 strokes. Among the modern Parsees a man must not lie with 

his wife after she is four months and ten days pregnant. Mohammedanism 

cannot be described as an ascetic religion, yet long and frequent periods 

of sexual abstinence are enjoined. There must be no sexual intercourse 

during the whole of pregnancy, during suckling, during menstruation (and 

for eight days before and after), nor during the thirty days of the 

Ramedan fast. Other times of sexual abstinence are also prescribed; thus 

among the Mohammedan Yezidis of Mardin in northern Mesopotamia there must 

be no sexual intercourse on Wednesdays or Fridays.[222] 

 

In the early Christian Church many rules of sexual abstinence still 

prevailed, similar to those usual among savages, though not for such 

prolonged periods. In Egbert's Penitential, belonging to the ninth 

century, it is stated that a woman must abstain from intercourse with her 

husband three months after conception and for forty days after birth. 

There were a number of other occasions, including Lent, when a husband 

must not know his wife.[223] "Some canonists say," remarks Jeremy Taylor, 

"that the Church forbids a mutual congression of married pairs upon 

festival days.... The Council of Eliberis commanded abstinence from 

conjugal rights for three or four or seven days before the communion. Pope 

Liberius commanded the same during the whole time of Lent, supposing the 

fast is polluted by such congressions."[224] 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[196] A. Sutherland, _Origin and Growth of the Moral Instinct_, vol. i, 

pp. 8, 187. As has been shown by, for instance, Dr. Iwan Bloch (_Beitraege 

zur AEtiologie der Psychopathia Sexualis_, Erster Theil, 1902), every 

perverse sexual practice may be found, somewhere or other, among savages 

or barbarians; but, as the same writer acutely points out (p. 58), these 

devices bear witness to the need of overcoming frigidity rather than to 

the strength of the sexual impulse. 

 

[197] Ploss and Bartels have brought together in _Das Weib_ a large number 

of facts in the same sense, more especially under the headings of 

_Abstinenz-Vorschriften_ and _Die Fernhaltung der Schwangeren_. I have not 

drawn upon their collection. 

 

[198] _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, May, 1896, p. 369. 

 

[199] Hyades and Deniker, _Mission Scientifique du Cap Horn_, vol. vii, p. 

188. 

 

[200] F. Cook, _New York Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics_, 1894. 

 

[201] A. d'Orbigny, _L'Homme Americain_, 1839, vol. i, p. 47. 

 

[202] A.B. Holder, "Gynecic Notes Among the American Indians," _American 

Journal of Obstetrics_, 1892, vol. xxvi, No. 1. 

 

[203] _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 1905, p. 139. 

 

[204] Foley, _Bulletin de la Societe d' Anthropologie_, Paris, November 6, 

1879. 

 

[205] J.S. Gardiner, _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, February, 

1898, p. 409. 

 

[206] As regards the modern Maoris, a medical correspondent in New Zealand 

writes: "It is nothing for members of both sexes to live in the same room, 

and for promiscuous intercourse to take place between father and daughter 

or brother and sister. Maori women, who will display a great deal of 

modesty when in the presence of male Maoris, will openly ask strange 

Europeans to have sexual intercourse with them, and without any desire for 

reward. The men, however, seem to prefer their own women, and even when 


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