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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

that this disgust is inhibited. If, however, among savages the sexual 

impulse is habitually weak, and only aroused to strength under the impetus 

of powerful stimuli, often acting periodically, then we should expect the 

_horror_ to be a factor of considerable importance. 

 

The weakness of the physical sexual impulse among savages is reflected in 

the psychic sphere. Many writers have pointed out that love plays but a 

small part in their lives. They practise few endearments; they often only 

kiss children (Westermarck notes that sexual love is far less strong than 

parental love); love-poems are among some primitive peoples few (mostly 

originating with the women), and their literature often gives little or no 

attention to passion.[192] Affection and devotion are, however, often 

strong, especially in savage women. 

 

It is not surprising that jealousy should often, though not by any means 

invariably, be absent, both among men and among women. Among savages this 

is doubtless a proof of the weakness of the sexual impulse. Spencer and 

Gillen note the comparative absence of jealousy in men among the Central 

Australian tribes they studied.[193] Negresses, it is said by a French 

army surgeon in his _Untrodden Fields of Anthropology_, do not know what 

jealousy is, and the first wife will even borrow money to buy the second 

wife. Among a much higher race, the women in a Korean household, it is 

said, live together happily, as an almost invariable rule, though it 

appears that this was not always the case among a polygamous people of 

European race, the Mormons. 

 

The tendency of the sexual instinct in savages to periodicity, to seasonal 

manifestations, I do not discuss here, as I have dealt with it in the 

first volume of these _Studies_.[194] It has, however, a very important 

bearing on this subject. Periodicity of sexual manifestations is, indeed, 

less absolute in primitive man than in most animals, but it is still very 

often quite clearly marked. It is largely the occurrence of these violent 

occasional outbursts of the sexual instinct--during which the organic 

impulse to tumescence becomes so powerful that external stimuli are no 

longer necessary--that has led to the belief in the peculiar strength of 

the impulse in savages.[195] 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[181] Thus, Lubbock (Lord Avebury), in the _Origin of Civilization_, fifth 

edition, 1889, brings forward a number of references in evidence of this 

belief. More recently Finck, in his _Primitive Love and Love-stories_, 

1899, seeks to accumulate data in favor of the unbounded licentiousness of 

savages. He admits, however, that a view of the matter opposed to his own 

is now tending to prevail. 

 

[182] See "The Evolution of Modesty" in the first volume of these 

_Studies_. 

 

[183] The sacredness of sexual relations often applies also to individual 

marriage. Thus, Skeat, in his _Malay Magic_, shows that the bride and 

bridegroom are definitely recognized as sacred, in the same sense that the 

king is, and in Malay States the king is a very sacred person. See also, 

concerning the sacred character of coitus, whether individual or 

collective, A. Van Gennep, _Rites de Passage, passim_. 

 

[184] Spencer and Gillen, _Northern Tribes of Central Australia_, p. 136. 

 

[185] _Religion of the Semites_, second edition, 1894, p. 454 _et seq._ 

 

[186] _History of Marriage_, pp. 66-70, 150-156, etc. 

 

[187] _Golden Bough_, third edition, part ii, _Taboo and the Perils of the 

Soul_. Frazer has discussed taboo generally. For a shorter account of 

taboo, see art. "Taboo" by Northcote Thomas in _Encyclopaedia Britannica_, 

eleventh edition, 1911. Freud has lately (_Imago_, 1912) made an attempt 

to explain the origin of taboo psychologically by comparing it to neurotic 

obsessions. Taboo, Freud believes, has its origin in a forbidden act to 

perform which there is a strong unconscious tendency; an ambivalent 

attitude, that is, combining the opposite tendencies, is thus established. 


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