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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

the variety of her feelings, all subordinated to the supreme 

emotion which dominates her. Her ideas follow one another with 

prodigious rapidity, and produce a lambent play which is fed by 

her heart alone. If she ceases to love, her mind becomes merely 

the scoria of the lava which yesterday had been so bright." 

 

Cabanis had already made some observations to much the same 

effect. Referring to the years of nubility following puberty, he 

remarks: "I have very often seen the greatest fecundity of ideas, 

the most brilliant imagination, a singular aptitude for the arts, 

suddenly develop in girls of this age, only to give place soon 

afterward to the most absolute mental mediocrity." (Cabanis, "De 

l'Influence des Sexes," etc., _Rapports du Physique et du Morale 

de l'Homme_.) 

 

This phenomenon seems to be one of the indications of the immense organic 

significance of the sexual relations. Woman's part in the world is less 

obtrusively active than man's, but there is a moment when nature cannot 

dispense with energy and mental vigor in women, and that is during the 

reproductive period. The languidest woman must needs be alive when her 

sexual emotions are profoundly stirred. People often marvel at the 

infatuation which men display for women who, in the eyes of all the world, 

seem commonplace and dull. This is not, as we usually suppose, always 

entirely due to the proverbial blindness of love. For the man whom she 

loves, such a woman is often alive and transformed. He sees a woman who is 

hidden from all the world. He experiences something of that surprise and 

awe which Dostoieffsky felt when the seemingly dull and brutish criminals 

of Siberia suddenly exhibited gleams of exquisite sensibility. 

 

In women, it must further be said, the sexual impulse shows a much more 

marked tendency to periodicity than in men; not only is it less apt to 

appear spontaneously, but its spontaneous manifestations are in a very 

pronounced manner correlated with menstruation. A woman who may experience 

almost overmastering sexual desire just before, during, or after the 

monthly period may remain perfectly calm and self-possessed during the 

rest of the month. In men such irregularities of the sexual impulse are 

far less marked. Thus it is that a woman may often appear capricious, 

unaccountable, or cold, merely because her moments of strong emotion have 

been physiologically confined within a limited period. She may be one day 

capable of audacities of which on another the very memory might seem to 

have left her. 

 

Not only is the intensity of the sexual impulse in women, as compared to 

men, more liable to vary from day to day, or from week to week, but the 

same greater variability is marked when we compare the whole cycle of life 

in women to that of men. The stress of early womanhood, when the 

reproductive functions are in fullest activity, and of late womanhood, 

when they are ceasing, produces a profound organic fermentation, psychic 

as much as physical, which is not paralleled in the lives of men. This 

greater variability in the cycle of a woman's life as compared with a 

man's is indicated very delicately and precisely by the varying incidence 

of insanity, and is made clearly visible in a diagram prepared by Marro 

showing the relative liability to mental diseases in the two sexes 

according to age.[180] At the age of 20 the incidence of insanity in both 

sexes is equal; from that age onward the curve in men proceeds in a 

gradual and equable manner, with only the slightest oscillation, on to old 

age. But in women the curve is extremely irregular; it remains high during 

all the years from 20 to 30, instead of falling like the masculine curve; 

then it falls rapidly to considerably below the masculine curve, rising 

again considerably above the masculine level during the climacteric years 

from 40 to 50, after which age the two sexes remain fairly close together 


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