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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

object; but when this passion is once rooted in women it is much 

stronger and more durable than in men, and rather increases than 

diminishes by enjoying the person of the beloved." (_A Modest 

Defence of Public Stews_, 1724, p. 34.) Burdach considered that 

women only acquire the full enjoyment of their general strength 

after marriage and pregnancy, while it is before marriage that 

men have most vigor. Schopenhauer also said that a man's love 

decreases with enjoyment, and a woman's increases. And Ellen Key 

has remarked (_Love and Marriage_) that "where there is no 

mixture of Southern blood it is a long time, sometimes indeed not 

till years after marriage, that the senses of the Northern women 

awake to consciousness." 

 

Even among animals this tendency seems to be manifested. Edmund 

Selous (_Bird Watching_, p. 112) remarks, concerning sea-gulls: 

"Always, or almost always, one of the birds--and this I take to 

be the female--is more eager, has a more soliciting manner and 

tender begging look than the other. It is she who, as a rule, 

draws the male bird on. She looks fondly up at him, and, raising 

her bill to his, as though beseeching a kiss, just touches with 

it, in raising, the feathers of the throat--an action light, but 

full of endearment. And in every way she shows herself the most 

desirous, and, in fact, so worries and pesters the poor male gull 

that often, to avoid her importunities, he flies away. This may 

seem odd, but I have seen other instances of it. No doubt, in 

actual courting, before the sexes are paired, the male bird is 

usually the most eager, but after marriage the female often 

becomes the wooer. Of this I have seen some marked instances." 

Selous mentions especially the plover, kestrel hawk, and rook. 

 

In association with the fact that women tend to show an increase of sexual 

ardor after sexual relationships have been set up may be noted the 

probably related fact that sexual intercourse is undoubtedly less 

injurious to women than to men. Other things being equal, that is to say, 

the threshold of excess is passed very much sooner by the man than by the 

woman. This was long ago pointed out by Montaigne. The ancient saying, 

"_Omne animal post coitum triste_," is of limited application at the best, 

but certainly has little reference to women.[174] Alacrity, rather than 

languor, as Robin has truly observed,[175] marks a woman after coitus, or, 

as a medical friend of my own has said, a woman then goes about the house 

singing.[176] It is, indeed, only after intercourse with a woman for whom, 

in reality, he feels contempt that a man experiences that revulsion of 

feeling described by Shakespeare (sonnet cxxix). Such a passage should not 

be quoted, as it sometimes has been quoted, as the representation of a 

normal phenomenon. But, with equal gratification on both sides, it remains 

true that, while after a single coitus the man may experience a not 

unpleasant lassitude and readiness for sleep, this is rarely the case with 

his partner, for whom a single coitus is often but a pleasant stimulus, 

the climax of satisfaction not being reached until a second or subsequent 

act of intercourse. "Excess in venery," which, rightly or wrongly, is set 

down as the cause of so many evils in men, seldom, indeed, appears in 

connection with women, although in every act of venery the woman has taken 

part.[177] 

 

That women bear sexual excesses better than men was noted by 

Cabanis and other early writers. Alienists frequently refer to 

the fact that women are less liable to be affected by insanity 

following such excesses. (See, e.g., Maudsley, "Relations between 

Body and Mind," _Lancet_, May 28, 1870; and G. Savage, art. 

"Marriage and Insanity" in _Dictionary of Psychological 

Medicine_.) Trousseau remarked on the fact that women are not 


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