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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

 

 

Another cause of inhibited sexual feeling has been brought 

forward. A married lady with normal sexual impulse states 

(_Sexual-Probleme_, April, 1912, p. 290) that she cannot 

experience orgasm and sexual satisfaction when the intercourse is 

not for conception. This is a psychic inhibition independent of 

any disturbance due to the process of prevention. She knows other 

women who are similarly affected. Such an inhibition must be 

regarded as artificial and abnormal, since the final result of 

sexual intercourse, under natural and normal conditions, forms no 

essential constituent of the psychic process of intercourse. 

 

As a result of the fact that in women the sexual emotions tend not to 

develop great intensity until submitted to powerful stimulation, we find 

that the maximum climax of sexual emotion tends to fall somewhat later in 

a woman's life than in a man's. Among animals generally there appears to 

be frequently traceable a tendency for the sexual activities of the male 

to develop at a somewhat earlier age than those of the female. In the 

human, species we may certainly trace the same tendency. As the great 

physiologist, Burdach, pointed out, throughout nature, with the 

accomplishment of the sexual act the part of the male in the work of 

generation comes to an end; but that act represents only the beginning of 

a woman's generative activity. 

 

A youth of 20 may often display a passionate ardor in love which is very 

seldom indeed found in women who are under 25. It is rare for a woman, 

even though her sexual emotions may awaken at puberty or earlier, to 

experience the great passion of her life until after the age of 25 has 

been passed. In confirmation of this statement, which is supported by 

daily observation, it may be pointed out that nearly all the most 

passionate love-letters of women, as well as their most passionate 

devotions, have come from women who had passed, sometimes long passed, 

their first youth. When Heloise wrote to Abelard the first of the letters 

which have come down to us she was at least 32. Mademoiselle Aisse's 

relation with the Chevalier began when she was 32, and when she died, six 

years later, the passion of each was at its height. Mary Wollstonecraft 

was 34 when her love-letters to Imlay began, and her child was born in the 

following year. Mademoiselle de Lespinasse was 43 when she began to write 

her letters to M. de Guibert. In some cases the sexual impulse may not 

even appear until after the period of the menopause has been passed.[173] 

 

In Roman times Ovid remarked (_Ars Amatoria_, lib. ii) that a 

woman fails to understand the art of love until she has reached 

the age of 35. "A girl of 18," said Stendhal (_De l'Amour_, ch. 

viii), "has not the power to crystallize her emotions; she forms 

desires that are too limited by her lack of experience in the 

things of life, to be able to love with such passion as a woman 

of 28." "Sexual needs," said Restif de la Bretonne (_Monsieur 

Nicolas_, vol. xi, p. 221), "often only appears in young women 

when they are between 26 and 27 years of age; at least, that is 

what I have observed." 

 

Erb states that it is about the middle of the twenties that women 

begin to suffer physically, morally, and intellectually from 

their sexual needs. Nystroem (_Das Geschlechtsleben_, p. 163) 

considers that it is about the age of 30 that a woman first 

begins to feel conscious of sex needs. In a case of Adler's (_op. 

cit._, p. 141), sexual feelings first appeared after the birth of 

the third child, at the age of 30. Forel (_Die Sexuelle Frage_, 

1906, p. 219) considers that sexual desire in woman is often 

strongest between the ages of 30 and 40. Leith Napier 

(_Menopause_, p. 94) remarks that from 28 to 30 is often an 

important age in woman who have retained their virginity, erotism 

then appearing with the full maturity of the nervous system. 


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