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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

between sexual desire and the impulse to evacuate an excretion, and that 

this analogy is not only seen in the frog, but extends also to the highest 

vertebrates. It is quite another matter, however, to assert that the 

sexual impulse can be adequately defined as an impulse to evacuate. To 

show fully the inadequate nature of this conception would require a 

detailed consideration of the facts of sexual life. That is, however, 

unnecessary. It is enough to point out certain considerations which alone 

suffice to invalidate this view. In the first place, it must be remarked 

that the trifling amount of fluid emitted in sexual intercourse is 

altogether out of proportion to the emotions aroused by the act and to its 

after-effect on the organism; the ancient dictum _omne animal post coitum 

triste_ may not be exact, but it is certain that the effect of coitus on 

the organism is far more profound than that produced by the far more 

extensive evacuation of the bladder or bowels. Again, this definition 

leaves unexplained all those elaborate preliminaries which, both in man 

and the lower animals, precede the sexual act, preliminaries which in 

civilized human beings sometimes themselves constitute a partial 

satisfaction to the sexual impulse. It must also be observed that, unlike 

the ordinary excretions, this discharge of the sexual glands is not 

always, or in every person, necessary at all. Moreover, the theory of 

evacuation at once becomes hopelessly inadequate when we apply it to 

women; no one will venture to claim that an adequate psychological 

explanation of the sexual impulse in a woman is to be found in the desire 

to expel a little bland mucus from the minute glands of the genital tract. 

We must undoubtedly reject this view of the sexual impulse. It has a 

certain element of truth and it permits an instructive and helpful 

analogy; but that is all. The sexual act presents many characters which 

are absent in an ordinary act of evacuation, and, on the other hand, it 

lacks the special characteristic of the evacuation proper, the 

elimination of waste material; the seminal fluid is not a waste material, 

and its retention is, to some extent perhaps, rather an advantage than a 

disadvantage to the organism. 

 

Eduard von Hartmann long since remarked that the satisfaction of what we 

call the sexual instinct through an act carried out with a person of the 

opposite sex is a very wonderful phenomenon. It cannot be said, however, 

that the conception of the sexual act as a simple process of evacuation 

does anything to explain the wonder. We are, at most, in the same position 

as regards the stilling of normal sexual desire as we should be as regards 

the emptying of the bladder, supposing it were very difficult for either 

sex to effect this satisfactorily without the aid of a portion of the body 

of a person of the other sex acting as a catheter. In such a case our 

thoughts and ideals would center around persons of opposite sex, and we 

should court their attention and help precisely as we do now in the case 

of our sexual needs. Some such relationship does actually exist in the 

case of the suckling mother and her infant. The mother is indebted to the 

child for the pleasurable relief of her distended breasts; and, while in 

civilization more subtle pleasures and intelligent reflection render this 

massive physical satisfaction comparatively unessential to the act of 

suckling, in more primitive conditions and among animals the need of this 

pleasurable physical satisfaction is a real bond between the mother and 

her offspring. The analogy is indeed very close: the erectile nipple 

corresponds to the erectile penis, the eager watery mouth of the infant to 

the moist and throbbing vagina, the vitally albuminous milk to the vitally 

albuminous semen.[17] The complete mutual satisfaction, physical and 

psychic, of mother and child, in the transfer from one to the other of a 

precious organized fluid, is the one true physiological analogy to the 


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