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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

sometimes be of dominant importance. Various investigators, from 

the time of Gall onward, have attempted to localize the sexual 

instinct centrally. Such attempts, however, cannot be said to 

have succeeded, although they tend to show that there is a real 

connection between the brain and the generative organs. Thus 

Ceni, of Modena, by experiments on chickens, claims to have 

proved the influence of the cortical centers of procreation on 

the faculty of generation, for he found that lesions of the 

cortex led to sterility corresponding in degree to the lesion; 

but as these results followed even independently of any 

disturbance of the sexual instinct, their significance is not 

altogether clear (Carlo Ceni, "L'Influenza dei Centri Corticali 

sui Fenomeni della Generazione," _Revista Sperimentale di 

Freniatria_, 1907, fasc. 2-3). At present, as Obici and 

Marchesini have well remarked, all that we can do is to assume 

the existence of cerebral as well as spinal sexual centers; a 

cerebral sexual center, in the strictest sense, remains purely 

hypothetical. 

 

Although Gall's attempt to locate the sexual instinct in the 

cerebellum--well supported as it was by observations--is no 

longer considered to be tenable, his discussion of the sexual 

instinct was of great value, far in advance of his time, and 

accompanied by a mass of facts gathered from many fields. He 

maintained that the sexual instinct is a function of the brain, 

not of the sexual organs. He combated the view ruling in his day 

that the seat of erotic mania must be sought in the sexual 

organs. He fully dealt with the development of the sexual 

instinct in many children before maturity of the sexual glands, 

the prolongation of the instinct into old age, its existence in 

the castrated and in the congenital absence of the sexual glands; 

he pointed out that even with an apparently sound and normal 

sexual apparatus all sorts of psychic pathological deviations may 

yet occur. In fact, all the lines of argument I have briefly 

indicated in the foregoing pages--although when they were first 

written this fact was unknown to me--had been fully discussed by 

this remarkable man nearly a century ago. (The greater part of 

the third volume of Gall's _Sur les Fonctions du Cerveau_, in the 

edition of 1825, is devoted to this subject. For a good summary, 

sympathetic, though critical, of Gall's views on this matter, see 

Moebius, "Ueber Gall's Specielle Organologie," _Schmidt's 

Jahrbuecher der Medicin_, 1900, vol. cclxvii; also _Ausgewahlte 

Werke_, vol. vii.) 

 

It will be seen that the question of the nature of the sexual impulse has 

been slowly transformed. It is no longer a question of the formation of 

semen in the male, of the function of menstruation in the female. It has 

become largely a question of physiological chemistry. The chief parts in 

the drama of sex, alike on its psychic as on its physical sides, are thus 

supposed to be played by two mysterious protagonists, the hormones, or 

internal secretions, of the testes and of the ovary. Even the part played 

by the brain is now often regarded as chemical, the brain being considered 

to be a great chemical laboratory. There is a tendency, moreover, to 

extend the sexual sphere so as to admit the influence of internal 

secretions from other glands. The thymus, the adrenals, the thyroid, the 

pituitary, even the kidneys: it is possible that internal secretions from 

all these glands may combine to fill in the complete picture of sexuality 

as we know it in men and women.[16] The subject is, however, so complex 

and at present so little known that it would be hazardous, and for the 

present purpose it is needless, to attempt to set forth any conclusions. 

 

It is sufficiently clear that there is on the surface a striking analogy 


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