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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Reference may finally be made to those cases in which the sexual impulse 

has developed notwithstanding the absence, verified or probable, of any 

sexual glands at all. In such cases sexual desire and sexual gratification 

are sometimes even stronger than normal. Colman has reported a case in 

which neither ovaries nor uterus could be detected, and the vagina was too 

small for coitus, but pleasurable intercourse took place by the rectum and 

sexual desire was at times so strong as to amount almost to nymphomania. 

Clara Barrus has reported the case of a woman in whom there was congenital 

absence of uterus and ovaries, as proved subsequently by autopsy, but the 

sexual impulse was very strong and she had had illicit intercourse with a 

lover. She suffered from recurrent mania, and then masturbated 

shamelessly; when sane she was attractively feminine. Macnaughton-Jones 

describes the case of a woman of 32 with normal sexual feelings and fully 

developed breasts, clitoris, and labia, but no vagina or internal 

genitalia could be detected even under the most thorough examination. In a 

case of Bridgman's, again, the womb and ovaries were absent, and the 

vagina small, but coitus was not painful, and the voluptuous sensations 

were complete and sexual passion was strong. In a case of Cotterill's, the 

ovaries and uterus were of minute size and functionless, and the vagina 

was absent, but the sexual feelings were normal, and the clitoris 

preserved its usual sensibility. Munde had recorded two similar cases, of 

which he presents photographs. In all these cases not only was the sexual 

impulse present in full degree, but the subjects were feminine in 

disposition and of normal womanly conformation; in most cases the external 

sexual organs were properly developed.[15] 

 

 

Fere (_L'Instinct sexuel_, p. 241) has sought to explain away 

some of these phenomena, in so far as they may be brought against 

the theory that the secretions and excretions of the sexual 

glands are the sole source of the sexual impulse. The persistence 

of sexual feelings after castration may be due, he argues, to the 

presence of the nerves in the cicatrices, just as the amputated 

have the illusion that the missing limb is still there. Exactly 

the same explanation has since been put forward by Moll, 

_Medizinische Klinik_, 1905, Nrs. 12 and 13. In the same way the 

presence of sexual feelings after the menopause may be due to 

similar irritation determined by degeneration during involution 

of the glands. The precocious appearance of the sexual impulse in 

childhood he would explain as due to an anomaly of development in 

the sexual organs. Fere makes no attempt to explain the presence 

of the sexual impulse in the congenital absence of the sexual 

glands; here, however, Munde intervenes with the suggestion that 

it is possible that in most cases "an infinitesimal trace of 

ovary" may exist, and preserve femininity, though insufficient to 

produce ovulation or menstruation. 

 

It is proper to mention these ingenious arguments. They are, 

however, purely hypothetical, obviously invented to support a 

theory. It can scarcely be said that they carry conviction. We 

may rather agree with Guinard that so great is the importance of 

reproduction that nature has multiplied the means by which 

preparation is made for the conjunction of the sexes and the 

roads by which sexual excitation may arrive. As Hirschfeld puts 

it, in a discussion of this subject (_Sexual-Probleme_, Feb., 

1912), "Nature has several irons in the fire." 

 

It will be seen that the conclusions we have reached indirectly 

involve the assumption that the spinal nervous centers, through 

which the sexual mechanism operates, are not sufficient to 

account for the whole of the phenomena of the sexual impulse. The 

nervous circuit tends to involve a cerebral element, which may 


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