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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

brought forward cases of serious nervous trouble in women which 

have been dispersed when the sexual weakness and premature 

ejaculation of the husband have been cured. 

 

The true nature of the passivity of the female is revealed by the ease 

with which it is thrown off, more especially when the male refuses to 

accept his cue. Or, if we prefer to accept the analogy of a game, we may 

say that in the play of courtship the first move belongs to the male, but 

that, if he fails to play, it is then the female's turn to play. 

 

Among many birds the males at mating time fall into a state of 

sexual frenzy, but not the females. "I cannot call to mind a 

single case," states an authority on birds (H.E. Howard, 

_Zooelogist_, 1902, p. 146), "where I have seen anything 

approaching frenzy in the female of any species while mating." 

 

Another great authority on birds, a very patient and skillful 

observer, Mr. Edmund Selous, remarks, however, in describing the 

courting habits of the ruffs and reeves (_Machetes pugnax_) that, 

notwithstanding the passivity of the females beforehand, their 

movements during and after coitus show that they derive at least 

as much pleasure as the males. (E. Selous, "Selection in Birds," 

_Zooelogist_, Feb. and May, 1907.) 

 

The same observer, after speaking of the great beauty of the male 

eider duck, continues: "These glorified males--there were a dozen 

of these, perhaps, to some six or seven females--swam closely 

about the latter, but more in attendance upon them than as 

actively pursuing them, for the females seemed themselves almost 

as active agents in the sport of being wooed as were their lovers 

in wooing them. The male bird first dipped down his head till his 

beak just touched the water, then raised it again in a 

constrained and tense manner,--the curious rigid action so 

frequent in the nuptial antics of birds,--at the same time 

uttering his strange haunting note. The air became filled with 

it; every moment one or other of the birds--sometimes several 

together--with upturned bill would softly laugh or exclaim, and 

while the males did this, the females, turning excitedly, and 

with little eager demonstrations from one to another of them, 

kept lowering and extending forward the head and neck in the 

direction of each in turn.... I noticed that a female would often 

approach a male bird with her head and neck laid flat along the 

water as though in a very 'coming on' disposition, and that the 

male bird declined her advances. This, taken in conjunction with 

the actions of the female when courted by the male, appears to me 

to raise a doubt as to the universal application of the law that 

throughout nature the male, in courtship, is eager, and the 

female coy. Here, to all appearances, courtship was proceeding, 

and the birds had not yet mated. The female eider ducks, 

however,--at any rate, some of them,--appeared to be anything but 

coy." (_Bird Watching_, pp. 144-146.) 

 

Among moor-hens and great-crested grebes sometimes what Selous 

terms "functional hermaphroditism" occurs and the females play 

the part of the male toward their male companions, and then 

repeat the sexual act with a reversion to the normal order, the 

whole to the satisfaction of both parties. (E. Selous, 

_Zooelogist_, 1902, p. 196.) 

 

It is not only among birds that the female sometimes takes the 

active part, but also among mammals. Among white rats, for 

instance, the males are exceptionally eager. Steinach, who has 

made many valuable experiments on these animals (_Archiv fuer die 

Gesammte Physiologie_, Bd. lvi, 1894, p. 319), tells us that, 

when a female white rat is introduced into the cage of a male, he 

at once leaves off eating, or whatever else he may be doing, 

becomes indifferent to noises or any other source of 


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