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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

replied, ingenuously but with assurance, that she could recognize the 

footprints of every young man in the neighborhood, even in a plowed 

field.[171] No better illustration could be given of the real significance 

of the sexual passivity of women, even at its most negative point. 

 

"The women I have known," a correspondent writes, "do not express 

their sensations and feelings as much as I do. Nor have I found 

women usually anxious to practise 'luxuries.' They seldom care to 

practice _fellatio_; I have only known one woman who offered to 

do _fellatio_ because she liked it. Nor do they generally care to 

masturbate a man; that is, they do not care greatly to enjoy the 

contemplation of the other person's excitement. (To me, to see 

the woman excited means almost more than my own pleasure.) They 

usually resist _cunnilinctus_, although they enjoy it. They do 

not seem to care to touch or look at a man's parts so much as he 

does at theirs. And they seem to dislike the tongue-kiss unless 

they feel very sexual or really love a man." My correspondent 

admits that his relationships have been numerous and facile, 

while his erotic demands tend also to deviate from the normal 

path. Under such circumstances, which not uncommonly occur, the 

woman's passions fail to be deeply stirred, and she retains her 

normal attitude of relative passivity. 

 

It is owing to the fact that the sexual passivity of women is 

only an apparent, and not a real, passivity that women are apt to 

suffer, as men are, from prolonged sexual abstinence. This, 

indeed, has been denied, but can scarcely be said to admit of 

doubt. The only question is as to the relative amount of such 

suffering, necessarily a very difficult question. As far back as 

the fourteenth century Johannes de Sancto Amando stated that 

women are more injured than men by sexual abstinence. In modern 

times Maudsley considers that women "suffer more than men do from 

the entire deprivation of sexual intercourse" ("Relations between 

Body and Mind," _Lancet_, May 28, 1870). By some it has been held 

that this cause may produce actual disease. Thus, Tilt, an 

eminent gynecologist of the middle of the nineteenth century, in 

discussing this question, wrote: "When we consider how much of 

the lifetime of woman is occupied by the various phases of the 

generative process, and how terrible is often the conflict within 

her between the impulse of passion and the dictates of duty, it 

may be well understood how such a conflict reacts on the organs 

of the sexual economy in the unimpregnated female, and 

principally on the ovaria, causing an orgasm, which, if often 

repeated, may _possibly_ be productive of subacute ovaritis." 

(Tilt, _On Uterine and Ovarian Inflammation_, 1862, pp. 309-310.) 

Long before Tilt, Haller, it seems, had said that women are 

especially liable to suffer from privation of sexual intercourse 

to which they have been accustomed, and referred to chlorosis, 

hysteria, nymphomania, and simple mania curable by intercourse. 

Hegar considers that in women an injurious result follows the 

nonsatisfaction of the sexual impulse and of the "ideal 

feelings," and that symptoms thus arise (pallor, loss of flesh, 

cardialgia, malaise, sleeplessness, disturbances of menstruation) 

which are diagnosed as "chlorosis." (Hegar, _Zusammenhang der 

Geschlechtskrankheiten mit nervoesen Leiden_, 1885, p. 45.) Freud, 

as well as Gattel, has found that states of anxiety 

(_Angstzustaende_) are caused by sexual abstinence. Loewenfeld, on 

careful examination of his own cases, is able to confirm this 

connection in both sexes. He has specially noticed it in young 

women who marry elderly husbands. Loewenfeld believes, however, 

that, on the whole, healthy unmarried women bear sexual 


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