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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

as foolish, act, she declares it never took place by her own will 

at all. "Now, I ask you, gentlemen," I once heard an experienced 

counsel address the jury in a criminal case, "as men of the 

world, have you ever known or heard of a woman, a single woman, 

confess that she had had sexual connection and not declare that 

force had been used to compel her to such connection?" The 

statement is a little sweeping, but in this matter there is some 

element of truth in the "man of the world's" opinion. One may 

refer to the story (told by Etienne de Bourbon, by Francisco de 

Osuna in a religious work, and by Cervantes in _Don Quixote_, 

part ii, ch. xlv) concerning a magistrate who, when a girl came 

before him to complain of rape, ordered the accused young man 

either to marry her or pay her a sum of money. The fine was paid, 

and the magistrate then told the man to follow the girl and take 

the money from her by force; the man obeyed, but the girl 

defended herself so energetically that he could not secure the 

money. Then the judge, calling the parties before him again, 

ordered the fine to be returned: "Had you defended your chastity 

as well as you have defended your money it could not have been 

taken away from you." In most cases of "rape," in the case of 

adults, there has probably been some degree of consent, though 

that partial assent may have been basely secured by an appeal to 

the lower nervous centers alone, with no participation of the 

intelligence and will. Freud (_Zur Psychopathologie des 

Alltagslebens_, p. 87) considers that on this ground the judge's 

decision in _Don Quixote_ is "psychologically unjust," because in 

such a case the woman's strength is paralyzed by the fact that an 

unconscious instinct in herself takes her assailant's part 

against her own conscious resistance. But it must be remembered 

that the factor of instinct plays a large part even when no 

violence is attempted. 

 

Such facts and considerations as these tend to show that the sexual 

impulse is by no means so weak in women as many would lead us to think. It 

would appear that, whereas in earlier ages there was generally a tendency 

to credit women with an unduly large share of the sexual impulse, there is 

now a tendency to unduly minimize the sexual impulse in women. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[156] I have had occasion to refer to the historic evolution of male 

opinion regarding women in previous volumes, as, e.g., _Man and Woman_, 

chapter i, and the appendix on "The Influence of Menstruation on the 

Position of Women" in the first volume of these _Studies_. 

 

[157] The terminology proposed by Ziehen ("Zur Lehre von den 

psychopathischen Konstitutionen," _Charite Annalen_, vol. xxxxiii, 1909) 

is as follows: For absence of sexual feeling, _anhedonia_; for diminution 

of the same, _hyphedonia_; for excess of sexual feeling, _hyperhedonia_; 

for qualitative sexual perversions, _parhedonia_. "Erotic blindness" was 

suggested by Nardelli. 

 

[158] O. Adler, _Die Mangelhafte Geschlechtsempfindung des Weibes_, 1904, 

p. 146. 

 

[159] A correspondent tells me that he knows a woman who has been a 

prostitute since the age of 15, but never experienced sexual pleasure and 

a real, non-simulated orgasm till she was 23; since then she has become 

very sensual. In other similar cases the hitherto indifferent prostitute, 

having found the man who suits her, abandons her profession, even though 

she is thereby compelled to live in extreme poverty. "An insensible 

woman," as La Bruyere long ago remarked in his chapter "Des Femmes," "is 

merely one who has not yet seen the man she must love." 

 

[160] Guttceit (_Dreissig Jahre Praxis_, vol. i, p. 416) pointed out that 

the presence or absence of the orgasm is the only factor in "sexual 

anesthesia" of which we can speak at all definitely; and he believed that 


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