Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

and sexual desire, was from between 30 and 34 years of age. Matthews 

Duncan assumes that the absence of sexual desire and sexual pleasure in 

women is thoroughly abnormal.[166] 

 

An English non-medical author, in the course of a thoughtful discussion of 

sexual phenomena, revealing considerable knowledge and observation,[167] 

has devoted a chapter to this subject in another of its aspects. Without 

attempting to ascertain the normal strength of the sexual instinct in 

women, he briefly describes 11 cases of "sexual anesthesia" in Women (in 2 

or 3 of which there appears, however, to be an element of latent 

homosexuality) from among the circle of his own friends. This author 

concludes that sexual coldness is very common among English women, and 

that it involves questions of great social and ethical importance. 

 

I have not met with any series of observations made among 

seemingly healthy and normal women in other countries; there are, 

however, various series of somewhat abnormal cases in which the 

point was noted, and the results are not uninstructive. Thus, in 

Vienna at Krafft-Ebing's psychiatric clinic, Gattel (_Ueber die 

sexuellen Ursachen der Neurasthenie und Angstneurose_, 1898) 

carefully investigated the cases of 42 women, mostly at the 

height of sexual life,--i.e., between 20 and 35,--who were 

suffering from slight nervous disorders, especially neurasthenia 

and mild hysteria, but none of them from grave nervous or other 

disease. Of these 42, at least 17 had masturbated, at one time or 

another, either before or after marriage, in order to obtain 

relief of sexual feelings. In the case of 4 it is stated that 

they do not obtain sexual satisfaction in marriage, but in these 

cases only _coitus interruptus_ is practised, and the fact that 

the absence of sexual satisfaction was complained of seems to 

indicate an aptitude for experiencing it. These 4 cases can 

therefore scarcely be regarded as exceptions. In all the other 

cases sexual desire, sexual excitement, or sexual satisfaction is 

always clearly indicated, and in a considerable proportion of 

cases it is noted that the sexual impulse is very strongly 

developed. This series is valuable, since the facts of the sexual 

life are, as far as possible, recorded with much precision. The 

significance of the facts varies, however, according to the view 

taken as to the causation of neurasthenia and allied conditions 

of slight nervous disorder. Gattel argues that sexual 

irregularities are a peculiarly fruitful, if not invariable, 

source of such disorders; according to the more commonly accepted 

view this is not so. If we accept the more usual view, these 

women fairly correspond to average women of lower class; if, 

however, we accept Gattel's view, they may possess the sexual 

instinct in a more marked degree than average women. 

 

In a series of 116 German women in whom the operation of removing 

the ovaries was performed, Pfister usually noted briefly in what 

way the sexual impulse was affected by the operation ("Die 

Wirkung der Castration auf den Weiblichen Organismus," _Archiv 

fuer Gynaekologie_, 1898, p. 583). In 13 cases (all but 3 

unmarried) the presence of sexual desire at any time was denied, 

and 2 of these expressed disgust of sexual matters. In 12 cases 

the point is left doubtful. In all the other cases sexual desire 

had once been present, and in 2 or 3 cases it was acknowledged to 

be so strong as to approach nymphomania. In about 30 of these 

(not including any in which it was previously very strong) it was 

extinguished by castration, in a few others it was diminished, 

and in the rest unaffected. Thus, when we exclude the 12 cases in 

which the point was not apparently investigated, and the 10 

unmarried women, in whom it may have been latent or unavowed, we 


Page 3 from 5:  Back   1   2  [3]  4   5   Forward