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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

imagines that to secure a woman's love and respect he must give 

her her own way in small things, and compel her obedience in 

great ones. Every man who desires success with a woman should 

exactly reverse that theory." 

 

When we are faced by these various and often conflicting statements of 

opinion it seems necessary to obtain, if possible, a definite basis of 

objective fact. It would be fairly obvious in any case, and it becomes 

unquestionable in view of the statements I have brought together, that the 

best-informed and most sagacious clinical observers, when giving an 

opinion on a very difficult and elusive subject which they have not 

studied with any attention and method, are liable to make unguarded 

assertions; sometimes, also, they become the victims of ethical or 

pseudoethical prejudices, so as to be most easily influenced by that class 

of cases which happens to fit in best with their prepossessions.[164] In 

order to reach any conclusions on a reasonable basis it is necessary to 

take a series of unselected individuals and to ascertain carefully the 

condition of the sexual impulse in each. 

 

At present, however, this is extremely difficult to do at all 

satisfactorily, and quite impossible, indeed, to do in a manner likely to 

yield absolutely unimpeachable results. Nevertheless, a few series of 

observations have been made. Thus, Dr. Harry Campbell[165] records the 

result of an investigation, carried on in his hospital practice, of 52 

married women of the poorer class; they were not patients, but ordinary, 

healthy working-class women, and the inquiry was not made directly, but of 

the husbands, who were patients. Sexual instinct was said to be present in 

12 cases before marriage, and absent in 40; in 13 of the 40 it never 

appeared at all; so that it altogether appeared in 39, or in the ratio of 

something over 75 per cent. Among the 12 in whom it existed before 

marriage it was said to have appeared in most with puberty; in 3, however, 

a few years before puberty, and in 2 a few years later. In 2 of those in 

whom it appeared before puberty, menstruation began late; in the third it 

rose almost to nymphomania on the day preceding the first menstruation. 

In nearly all the cases desire was said to be stronger in the husband than 

in the wife; when it was stronger in the wife, the husband was 

exceptionally indifferent. Of the 13 in whom desire was absent after 

marriage, 5 had been married for a period under two years, and Campbell 

remarks that it would be wrong to conclude that it would never develop in 

these cases, for in this group of cases the appearance of sexual instinct 

was sometimes a matter of days, sometimes of years, after the date of 

marriage. In two-thirds of the cases there was a diminution of desire, 

usually gradual, at the climacteric; in the remaining third there was 

either no change or exaltation of desire. The most important general 

result, Campbell concludes, is that "the sexual instinct is very much less 

intense in woman than in man," and to this he elsewhere adds a corollary 

that "the sexual instinct in the civilized woman is, I believe, tending to 

atrophy." 

 

An eminent gynecologist, the late Dr. Matthews Duncan, has (in his work on 

_Sterility in Women_) presented a table which, although foreign to this 

subject, has a certain bearing on the matter. Matthews Duncan, believing 

that the absence of sexual desire and of sexual pleasure in coitus are 

powerful influences working for sterility, noted their presence or absence 

in a number of cases, and found that, among 191 sterile women between the 

ages of 15 and 45, 152, or 79 per cent., acknowledged the presence of 

sexual desire; and among 196 sterile women (mostly the same cases), 134, 

or 68 per cent., acknowledged the presence of sexual pleasure in coitus. 

Omitting the cases over 35 years of age, which were comparatively few, the 

largest proportion of affirmative answers, both as regards sexual pleasure 


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