Main  Contacts  
Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

from the fact that most women fear by the admission to place 

themselves in an impure category. I am also satisfied that influx 

of women into universities, etc., is often due to the sexual 

impulse causing restlessness, and that this factor finds 

expression in the prurient prudishness so often presenting itself 

in such women, which interferes with coeducation. This is 

becoming especially noticeable at the University of Chicago, 

where prudishness interferes with classical, biological, 

sociological, and physiological discussion in the classroom. 

There have been complaints by such women that a given professor 

has not left out embryological facts not in themselves in any way 

implying indelicacy. I have even been informed that the opinion 

is often expressed in college dormitories that embryological 

facts and discussions should be left out of a course intended for 

both sexes." Such prudishness, it is scarcely necessary to 

remark, whether found in women or men, indicates a mind that has 

become morbidly sensitive to sexual impressions. For the healthy 

mind embryological and allied facts have no emotionally sexual 

significance, and there is, therefore, no need to shun them. 

 

 

 

Kolischer, of Chicago ("Sexual Frigidity in Women," _American 

Journal of Obstetrics_, Sept., 1905), points out that it is often 

the failure of the husband to produce sexual excitement in the 

wife which leads to voluntary repression of sexual sensation on 

her part, or an acquired sexual anesthesia. "Sexual excitement," 

he remarks, "not brought to its natural climax, the reaction 

leaves the woman in a very disagreeable condition, and repeated 

occurrences of this kind may even lead to general nervous 

disturbances. Some of these unfortunate women learn to suppress 

their sexual sensation so as to avoid all these disagreeable 

sequelae. Such a state of affairs is not only unfortunate, because 

it deprives the female partner of her natural rights, but it is 

also to be deplored because it practically brings down such a 

married woman to the level of the prostitute." 

 

In illustration of the prevalence of inhibitions of various 

kinds, from without and from within, in suppressing or disguising 

sexual feeling in women, I may quote the following observations 

by an American lady concerning a series of women of her 

acquaintance:-- 

 

"Mrs. A. This woman is handsome and healthy. She has never had 

children, much to the grief of herself and her husband. The man 

is also handsome and attractive. Mrs. A. once asked me if 

love-making between me and my husband ever originated with me. I 

replied it was as often so as not, and she said that in that 

event she could not see how passion between husband and wife 

could be regulated. When I seemed not to be ashamed of the 

matter, but rather to be positive in my views that it should be 

so, she at once tried to impress me with the fact that she did 

not wish me to think she 'could not be aroused.' This woman 

several times hinted that she had learned a great amount that was 

not edifying at boarding school, and I always felt that, with 

proper encouragement, she would have retailed suggestive stories. 

 

"Mrs. B. This woman lives to please her husband, who is a spoiled 

man. She gave birth to a child soon after marriage, but was left 

an invalid for some years. She told me coition always hurt her, 

and she said it made her sick to see her husband nude. I was 

therefore surprised, years afterward, to hear her say, in reply 

to a remark of another person, 'Yes; women are not only as 

passionate as men, I am sure they are more so.' I therefore 

questioned the lack of passion she had on former occasions 

avowed, or else felt convinced her improvement in health had made 


Page 4 from 5:  Back   1   2   3  [4]  5   Forward