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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Elsewhere Moll (_Kontraere Sexualempfindung_, third edition, 1890, 

p. 510) emphasizes the statement that "sexual anesthesia in women 

is much more frequent than is generally supposed." He explains 

that he is referring to the physical element of pleasure and 

satisfaction in intercourse, and of desire for intercourse. He 

adds that the psychic side of love is often more conspicuous in 

women than in men. He cannot agree with Sollier that this kind of 

sexual frigidity is a symptom of hysteria. Fere (_L'Instinct 

Sexuel_, second edition, p. 112), in referring to the greater 

frequency of sexual anesthesia in women, remarks that it is often 

associated with neuropathic states, as well as with anomalies of 

the genital organs, or general troubles of nutrition, and is 

usually acquired. Some authors attribute great importance to 

amenorrhea in this connection; one investigator has found that in 

4 out of 14 cases of absolute amenorrhea sexual feeling was 

absent. Loewenfeld, again (_Sexualleben und Nervenleiden_), 

referring to the common misconception that nervous disorder is 

associated with increased sexual desire, points out that 

nervously degenerate women far more often display frigidity than 

increased sexual desire. Elsewhere (_Ueber die Sexuelle 

Konstitution_) Loewenfeld says it is only among the upper classes 

that sexual anesthesia is common. Campbell Clark, also, showed 

some years ago that, in young women with a tendency to chlorosis 

and a predisposition to insanity, defects of pelvic and mammary 

development are very prevalent. (_Journal of Mental Science_, 

October, 1888.) 

 

As regards the older medical authors, Schurig (_Spermatologia_, 

1720, p. 243, and _Gynaecologia_, 1730, p. 81) brought together 

from the literature and from his own knowledge cases of women who 

felt no pleasure in coitus, as well as of some men who had 

erections without pleasure. 

 

There is, however, much uncertainty as to what precisely is meant by 

sexual frigidity or anesthesia. All the old medical authors carefully 

distinguish between the heat of sexual desire and the actual presence of 

pleasure in coitus; many modern writers also properly separate _libido_ 

from _voluptas_, since it is quite possible to experience sexual desires 

and not to be able to obtain their gratification during sexual 

intercourse, and it is possible to hold, with Mantegazza, that women 

naturally have stronger sexual impulses than men, but are more liable than 

men to experience sexual anesthesia. But it is very much more difficult 

than most people seem to suppose, to obtain quite precise and definite 

data concerning the absence of either _voluptas_ or _libido_ in a woman. 

Even if we accept the statement of the woman who asserts that she has 

either or both, the statement of their absence is by no means equally 

conclusive and final. As even Adler--who discusses this question fully and 

has very pronounced opinions about it--admits, there are women who stoutly 

deny the existence of any sexual feelings until such feelings are 

actually discovered.[158] Some of the most marked characteristics of the 

sexual impulse in women, moreover,--its association with modesty, its 

comparatively late development, its seeming passivity, its need of 

stimulation,--all combine to render difficult the final pronouncement that 

a woman is sexually frigid. Most significant of all in this connection is 

the complexity of the sexual apparatus in women and the corresponding 

psychic difficulty--based on the fundamental principle of sexual 

selection--of finding a fitting mate. The fact that a woman is cold with 

one man or even with a succession of men by no means shows that she is not 

apt to experience sexual emotions; it merely shows that these men have not 

been able to arouse them. "I recall two very striking cases," a 


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