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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Eulenburg is of the same opinion as Kisch, and sharply criticises 

the loose assertion of some authorities who have expressed 

themselves in an opposite sense. (A. Eulenburg, _Sexuale 

Neuropathie_, pp. 88-90; the same author has dealt with the point 

in the _Zukunft_, December 2, 1893.) 

 

Kossmann states that the opinion as to the widespread existence 

of frigidity among women is a fable. (Kossmann, _Allgemeine 

Gynaecologie_, 1903, p. 362.) 

 

Bloch concludes that "in most cases the sexual coldness of women 

is in fact only apparent, either due to the concealment of 

glowing sexuality beneath the veil of outward reticence 

prescribed by conventional morality, or else to the husband who 

has not succeeded in arousing erotic sensations which are 

complicated and with difficulty awakened.... The sexual 

sensibility of women is certainly different from that of men, but 

in strength it is at least as great." (Iwan Bloch, _Das 

Sexualleben unserer Zeit_ 1907, ch. v.) 

 

Nystroem, also, after devoting a chapter to the discussion of the 

causes of sexual coldness in women, concludes: "My conviction, 

founded on experience, is, that only a small number of women 

would be without sexual feeling if sound views and teaching 

prevailed in respect to the sexual life, if due weight were given 

to inner devotion and tender caresses as the preliminaries of 

love in marriage, and if couples who wish to avoid pregnancy 

would adopt sensible preventive methods instead of _coitus 

interruptus_." (A. Nystroem, _Das Geschlichtsleben und seine 

Gesetze_, eighth edition, 1907, p. 177.) 

 

We thus find two opinions widely current: one, of world-wide existence and 

almost universally accepted in those ages and centers in which life is 

lived most nakedly, according to which the sexual impulse is stronger in 

women than in men; another, now widely prevalent in many countries, 

according to which the sexual instinct is distinctly weaker in women, if, 

indeed, it may not be regarded as normally absent altogether. A third view 

is possible: it may be held that there is no difference at all. This 

view, formerly not very widely held, is that of the French physiologist, 

Beaunis, as it is of Winckel; while Rohleder, who formerly held that 

sexual feeling tends to be defective in women, now believes that men and 

women are equal in sexual impulse. 

 

At an earlier period, however, Donatus (_De Medica Historia 

Mirabili_, 1613, lib. iv, cap. xvii) held the same view, and 

remarked that sometimes men and sometimes women are the more 

salacious, varying with the individual. Roubaud (_De 

l'Impuissance_, 1855, p. 38) stated that the question is so 

difficult as to be insoluble. 

 

In dealing with the characteristics of the sexual impulse in women, it 

will be seen, we have to consider the prevalence in them of what is 

commonly termed (in its slightest forms) frigidity or hyphedonia, and (in 

more complete form) sexual anesthesia or anaphrodism, or erotic blindness, 

or anhedonia.[157] 

 

Many modern writers have referred to the prevalence of frigidity 

among women. Shufeldt believes (_Pacific Medical Journal_, Nov., 

1907) that 75 per cent, of married women in New York are 

afflicted with sexual frigidity, and that it is on the increase; 

it is rare, however, he adds, among Jewish women. Hegar gives 50 

per cent, as the proportion of sexually anesthetic women; 

Fuerbringer says the majority of women are so. Effertz (quoted by 

Loewenfeld, _Sexualleben und Nervenleiden_, p. 11, apparently with 

approval) regards 10 per cent, among women generally as sexually 

anesthetic, but only 1 per cent, men. Moll states (Eulenburg's 

_Encyclopaedie_, fourth edition, art. "Geschlechtstrieb") that the 

prevalence of sexual anesthesia among German women varies, 

according to different authorities, from 10 to 66 per cent. 


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