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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

seventeenth century discussed at more or less length the relative 

amount of sexual desire in men and women, and the relative degree 

of their pleasure in coitus. It is remarkable that, although they 

usually attach great weight to the supposed opinion of 

Hippocrates in the opposite sense, most of them decide that both 

desire and pleasure are greater in women. 

 

Plazzonus decides that women have more sources of pleasure in 

coitus than men because of the larger extent of surface excited; 

and if it were not so, he adds, women would not be induced to 

incur the pains and risks of pregnancy and childbirth. 

(Plazzonus, _De Partibus Generationi Inservientibus_, 1621, lib. 

ii, cap. xiii.) 

 

"Without doubt," says Ferrand, "woman is more passionate than 

man, and more often torn by the evils of love." (Ferrand, _De la 

Maladie d'Amour_, 1623, chapter ii.) 

 

Zacchia, mainly on _a priori_ grounds, concludes that women have 

more pleasure in coitus than men. (Zacchia, _Quaestiones 

Medico-legales_, 1630, lib. iii, quest, vii.) 

 

Sinibaldus, discussing whether men or women have more salacity, 

decides in favor of women. (J.B. Sinibaldus, _Geneanthropeia_, 

1642, lib. ii, tract. ii, cap. v.) 

 

Hornius believed that women have greater sexual pleasure than 

men, though he mainly supported his opinion by the authority of 

classical poets. (Hornius, _Historic Naturalis_, 1670, lib. iii, 

cap. i.) 

 

Nenter describes what we may now call women's affectability, and 

considers that it makes them more prone than men to the sexual 

emotions, as is shown by the fact that, notwithstanding their 

modesty, they sometimes make sexual advances. This greater 

proneness of women to the sexual impulse is, he remarks, entirely 

natural and right, for the work of generation is mainly carried 

on by women, and love is its basis: "generationis fundamentum est 

amor." (G.P. Nenter, _Theoria Hominis Sani_, 1714, cap. v, memb. 

ii.) 

 

The above opinions of seventeenth-century physicians are quoted 

from the original sources. Schurig, in his _Gynaecologia_, (pp. 

46-50 and 71-81), quotes a number of passages on this subject 

from medical authorities of the same period, on which I have not 

drawn. 

 

Senancour, in his fine and suggestive book on love, first 

published in 1806, asks: "Has sexual pleasure the same power on 

the sex which less loudly demands it? It has more, at all events 

in some respects. The very vigor and laboriousness of men may 

lead them to neglect love, but the constant cares of maternity 

make women feel how important it must ever be to them. We must 

remember also that in men the special emotions of love only have 

a single focus, while in women the organs of lactation are united 

to those of conception. Our feelings are all determined by these 

material causes." (Senancour, _De l'Amour_, fourth edition, 1834, 

vol. i, p. 68.) A later psychologist of love, this time a woman, 

Ellen Key, states that woman's erotic demands, though more 

silent than man's, are stronger. (Ellen Key, _Ueber Liebe und 

Ehe_, p. 138.) 

 

Michael Ryan considered that sexual enjoyment "is more delicious 

and protracted" in women, and ascribed this to a more sensitive 

nervous system, a finer and more delicate skin, more acute 

feelings, and the fact that in women the mammae are the seat of a 

vivid sensibility in sympathy with the uterus. (M. Ryan, 

_Philosophy of Marriage_, 1837, p. 153.) 

 

Busch was inclined to think women have greater sexual pleasure 

than men. (D.W.H. Busch, _Das Geschlechtsleben des Weibes_, 1839, 

vol. i, p. 69.) Kobelt held that the anatomical conformation of 

the sexual organs in women led to the conclusion that this must 

be the case. 

 

Guttceit, speaking of his thirty years' medical experience in 


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