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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

as more inclined to sexual enjoyment than men. That was, for 

instance, the opinion of Tertullian (_De Virginibus Velandis_, 

chapter x), and it is clearly implied in some of St. Jerome's 

epistles. 

 

Notwithstanding the influence of Christianity, among the vigorous 

barbarian races of medieval Europe, the existence of sexual 

appetite in women was not considered to be, as it later became, a 

matter to be concealed or denied. Thus in 1068 the ecclesiastical 

historian, Ordericus Vitalis (himself half Norman and half 

English), narrates that the wives of the Norman knights who had 

accompanied William the Conqueror to England two years earlier 

sent over to their husbands to say that they were consumed by the 

fierce names of desire ("saeva libidinis face urebantur"), and 

that if their husbands failed to return very shortly they 

proposed to take other husbands. It is added that this threat 

brought a few husbands back to their wanton ladies ("lascivis 

dominabus suis"). 

 

During the medieval period in Europe, largely in consequence, no 

doubt, of the predominance of ascetic ideals set up by men who 

naturally regarded woman as the symbol of sex, the doctrine of 

the incontinence of woman became firmly fixed, and it is 

unnecessary and unprofitable to quote examples. It is sufficient 

to mention the very comprehensive statement of Jean de Meung (in 

the _Roman de la Rose_, 9903):-- 

 

"Toutes estes, seres, ou futes 

De fait ou de volunte putes." 

 

The satirical Jean de Meung was, however, a somewhat extreme and 

untypical representative of his age, and the fourteenth century 

Johannes de Sancto Amando (Jean de St. Amand) gives a somewhat 

more scientifically based opinion (quoted by Pagel, _Neue 

litterarische Beitraege zur Mittelalterlichen Medicin_, 1896, p. 

30) that sexual desire is stronger in women than in men. 

 

Humanism and the spread of the Renaissance movement brought in a 

spirit more sympathetic to women. Soon after, especially in Italy 

and France, we begin to find attempts at analyzing the sexual 

emotions, which are not always without a certain subtlety. In the 

seventeenth century a book of this kind was written by Venette. 

In matters of love, Venette declared, "men are but children 

compared to women. In these matters women have a more lively 

imagination, and they usually have more leisure to think of love. 

Women are much more lascivious and amorous than men." This is the 

conclusion reached in a chapter devoted to the question whether 

men or women are the more amorous. In a subsequent chapter, 

dealing with the question whether men or women receive more 

pleasure from the sexual embrace, Venette concludes, after 

admitting the great difficulty of the question, that man's 

pleasure is greater, but woman's lasts longer. (N. Venette, _De 

la Generation de l'Homme ou Tableau de l'Amour Conjugal_, 

Amsterdam, 1688.) 

 

At a much earlier date, however, Montaigne had discussed this 

matter with his usual wisdom, and, while pointing out that men 

have imposed their own rule of life on women and their own 

ideals, and have demanded from them opposite and contradictory 

virtues,--a statement not yet antiquated,--he argues that women 

are incomparably more apt and more ardent in love than men are, 

and that in this matter they always know far more than men can 

teach them, for "it is a discipline that is born in their veins." 

(Montaigne, _Essais_, book iii, chapter v.) 

 

The old physiologists generally mentioned the appearance of 

sexual desire in girls as one of the normal signs of puberty. 

This may be seen in the numerous quotations brought together by 

Schurig, in his _Parthenologia_, cap. ii. 

 

A long succession of distinguished physicians throughout the 


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