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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Adler, who discusses the question at some length, decides that 

the sexual needs of women are less than those of men, though in 

some cases the orgasm in quantity and quality greatly exceeds 

that of men. He believes, not only that the sexual impulse in 

women is absolutely less than in men, and requires stronger 

stimulation to arouse it, but that also it suffers from a latency 

due to inhibition, which acts like a foreign body in the brain 

(analogous to the psychic trauma of Breuer and Freud in 

hysteria), and demands great skill in the man who is to awaken 

the woman to love. (O. Adler, _Die Mangelhafte 

Geschlechtsempfindung des Weibes_, 1904, pp. 47, 126 et seq.; 

also enlarged second edition, 1911; id., "Die Frigide Frau," 

_Sexual-Probleme_, Jan., 1912.) 

 

It must not, however, be supposed that this view of the natural tendency 

of women to frigidity has everywhere found acceptance. It is not only an 

opinion of very recent growth, but is confined, on the whole, to a few 

countries. 

 

"Turn to history," wrote Brierre de Boismont, "and on every page 

you will be able to recognize the predominance of erotic ideas in 

women." It is the same today, he adds, and he attributes it to 

the fact that men are more easily able to gratify their sexual 

impulses. (_Des Hallucinations_, 1862, p. 431.) 

 

The laws of Manu attribute to women concupiscence and anger, the 

love of bed and of adornment. 

 

The Jews attributed to women greater sexual desire than to men. 

This is illustrated, according to Knobel (as quoted by Dillmann), 

by _Genesis_, chapter iii, v. 16. 

 

In Greek antiquity the romance and sentiment of love were mainly 

felt toward persons of the same sex, and were divorced from the 

more purely sexual feelings felt for persons of opposite sex. 

Theognis compared marriage to cattle-breeding. In love between 

men and women the latter were nearly always regarded as taking 

the more active part. In all Greek love-stories of early date the 

woman falls in love with the man, and never the reverse. AEschylus 

makes even a father assume that his daughters will misbehave if 

left to themselves. Euripides emphasized the importance of women; 

"The Euripidean woman who 'falls in love' thinks first of all: 

'How can I seduce the man I love?"' (E.F.M. Benecke, _Antimachus 

of Colophon and the Position of Women in Greek Poetry_, 1896, pp. 

34, 54.) 

 

The most famous passage in Latin literature as to the question of 

whether men or women obtain greater pleasure from sexual 

intercourse is that in which Ovid narrates the legend of Tiresias 

(_Metamorphoses_, iii, 317-333). Tiresias, having been both a man 

and a woman, decided in favor of women. This passage was 

frequently quoted down to the eighteenth century. 

 

In a passage quoted from a lost work of Galen by the Arabian 

biographer, Abu-l-Faraj, that great physician says of the 

Christians "that they practice celibacy, that even many of their 

women do so." So that in Galen's opinion it was more difficult 

for a woman than for a man to be continent. 

 

The same view is widely prevalent among Arabic authors, and there 

is an Arabic saying that "The longing of the woman for the penis 

is greater than that of the man for the vulva." 

 

In China, remarks Dr. Coltman, "when an old gentleman of my 

acquaintance was visiting me my little daughter, 5 years old, ran 

into the room, and, climbing upon my knee, kissed me. My visitor 

expressed his surprise, and remarked: 'We never kiss our 

daughters when they are so large; we may when they are very 

small, but not after they are 3 years old,' said he, 'because it 

is apt to excite in them bad emotions.'" (Coltman, _The Chinese_, 

1900, p. 99.) 

 

The early Christian Fathers clearly show that they regard women 


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