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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

of women lasts longer, and this opinion, though not usually 

accepted, was treated with great respect by medical authors down 

to the end of the seventeenth century. Thus A. Laurentius (Du 

Laurens), after a long discussion, decides that men have stronger 

sexual desire and greater pleasure in coitus than women. 

(_Historia Anatomica Humani Corporis_, 1599, lib. viii, quest, ii 

and vii.) 

 

About half a century ago a book entitled _Functions and Disorders 

of the Reproductive Organs_, by W. Acton, a surgeon, passed 

through many editions and was popularly regarded as a standard 

authority on the subjects with which it deals. This extraordinary 

book is almost solely concerned with men; the author evidently 

regards the function of reproduction as almost exclusively 

appertaining to men. Women, if "well brought up," are, and should 

be, he states, in England, absolutely ignorant of all matters 

concerning it. "I should say," this author again remarks, "that 

the majority of women (happily for society) are not very much 

troubled with sexual feeling of any kind." The supposition that 

women do possess sexual feelings he considers "a vile aspersion." 

 

In the article "Generation," contained in another medical work 

belonging to the middle of the nineteenth century,--Rees's 

_Cyclopedia_,--we find the following statement: "That a mucous 

fluid is sometimes found in coition from the internal organs and 

vagina is undoubted; but this only happens in lascivious women, 

or such as live luxuriously." 

 

Gall had stated decisively that the sexual desires of men are 

stronger and more imperious than those of women. (_Fonctions du 

Cerveau_, 1825, vol. iii, pp. 241-271.) 

 

Raciborski declared that three-fourths of women merely endure the 

approaches of men. (_De la Puberte chez la Femme_, 1844, p. 486.) 

 

"When the question is carefully inquired into and without 

prejudice," said Lawson Tait, "it is found that women have their 

sexual appetites far less developed than men." (Lawson Tait, 

"Remote Effects of Removal of the Uterine Appendages," 

_Provincial Medical Journal_, May, 1891.) "The sexual instinct is 

very powerful in man and comparatively weak in women," he stated 

elsewhere (_Diseases of Women_, 1889, p. 60). 

 

Hammond stated that, leaving prostitutes out of consideration, it 

is doubtful if in one-tenth of the instances of intercourse they 

[women] experience the slightest pleasurable sensation from first 

to last (Hammond, _Sexual Impotence_, p. 300), and he considered 

(p. 281) that this condition was sometimes congenital. 

 

 

Lombroso and Ferrero consider that sexual sensibility, as well as 

all other forms of sensibility, is less pronounced in women, and 

they bring forward various facts and opinions which seem to them 

to point in the same direction. "Woman is naturally and 

organically frigid." At the same time they consider that, while 

erethism is less, sexuality is greater than in men. (Lombroso and 

Ferrero, _La Donna Delinquente, la Prostituta, e la Donna 

Normale_, 1893, pp. 54-58.) 

 

"It is an altogether false idea," Fehling declared, in his 

rectorial address at the University of Basel in 1891, "that a 

young woman has just as strong an impulse to the opposite sex as 

a young man.... The appearance of the sexual side in the love of 

a young girl is pathological." (H. Fehling, _Die Bestimmung der 

Frau_, 1892, p. 18.) In his _Lehrbuch der Frauenkrankheiten_ the 

same gynecological authority states his belief that half of all 

women are not sexually excitable. 

 

 

 

 

Krafft-Ebing was of opinion that women require less sexual 

satisfaction than men, being less sensual. (Krafft-Ebing, "Ueber 

Neurosen und Psychosen durch sexuelle Abstinenz," _Jahrbuecher fuer 


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