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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

in human functions, such a co-ordination of ideas is entirely rational. 

But with the development of culture the tendency is for this homogeneous 

conception to be split up into two inharmonious tendencies. Even apart 

from Christianity and before its advent this may be noted. It was, 

however, to Christianity and the Christian ascetic spirit that we owe the 

complete differentiation and extreme development which these opposing 

views have reached. The condemnation of sexuality involved the 

glorification of the virgin; and indifference, even contempt, was felt for 

the woman who exercised sexual functions. It remained open to anyone, 

according to his own temperament, to identify the typical average woman 

with the one or with the other type; all the fund of latent sexual emotion 

which no ascetic rule can crush out of the human heart assured the 

picturesque idealization alike of the angelic and the diabolic types of 

woman. We may trace the same influence subtly lurking even in the most 

would-be scientific statements of anthropologists and physicians 

today.[156] 

 

It may not be out of place to recall at this point, once more, 

the fact, fairly obvious indeed, that the judgments of men 

concerning women are very rarely matters of cold scientific 

observation, but are colored both by their own sexual emotions 

and by their own moral attitude toward the sexual impulse. The 

ascetic who is unsuccessfully warring with his own carnal 

impulses may (like the voluptuary) see nothing in women but 

incarnations of sexual impulse; the ascetic who has subdued his 

own carnal impulses may see no elements of sex in women at all. 

Thus the opinions regarding this matter are not only tinged by 

elements of primitive culture, but by elements of individual 

disposition. Statements about the sexual impulses of women often 

tell us less about women than about the persons who make them. 

 

The curious manner in which for men women become incarnations of 

the sexual impulse is shown by the tendency of both general and 

personal names for women to become applicable to prostitutes 

only. This is the case with the words "garce" and "fille" in 

French, "Maedchen" and "Dirne" in German, as well as with the 

French "catin" (Catherine) and the German "Metze" (Mathilde). 

(See, e.g., R. Kleinpaul, _Die Raethsel der Sprache_, 1890, pp. 

197-198.) 

 

At the same time, though we have to recognize the presence of 

elements which color and distort in various ways the judgments of 

men regarding women, it must not be hastily assumed that these 

elements render discussion of the question altogether 

unprofitable. In most cases such prejudices lead chiefly to a 

one-sided solution of facts, against which we can guard. 

 

 

 

 

While, however, these two opposing currents of opinion are of very ancient 

origin, it is only within quite recent times, and only in two or three 

countries, that they have led to any marked difference of opinion 

regarding the sexual aptitude of women. In ancient times men blamed women 

for concupiscence or praised them for chastity, but it seems to have been 

reserved for the nineteenth century to state that women are apt to be 

congenitally incapable of experiencing complete sexual satisfaction, and 

peculiarly liable to sexual anesthesia. This idea appears to have been 

almost unknown to the eighteenth century. During the last century, 

however, and more especially in England, Germany, and Italy, this opinion 

has been frequently set down, sometimes even as a matter of course, with a 

tincture of contempt or pity for any woman afflicted with sexual emotions. 

 

In the treatise _On Generation_ (chapter v), which until recent 

times was commonly ascribed to Hippocrates, it is stated that men 

have greater pleasure in coitus than women, though the pleasure 


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