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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Geisteskrankheiten_, 1876, p. 153.) The phenomena are here, 

however, highly complex, and, as Hagen himself points out, the 

prophylactic influence of marriage, while very probable, is not 

the only or even the chief factor at work. 

 

It is worth noting that exactly the same sexual difference may be 

traced in England. It appears that, in ratio to similar groups in 

the general population (taking the years 1876-1900, inclusive), 

the number of admissions to asylums is the same for both sexes 

among married people (i.e., 8.5), but for the single it is larger 

among the men (4.8 to 4.5), as also it is among the widowed (17.9 

to 13.9) (_Fifty-sixth Annual Report of the Commissioners in 

Lunacy, England and Wales_, 1902, p. 141). This would seem to 

indicate that when living apart from men the tendency to insanity 

is less in women, but is raised to the male level when the sexes 

live together in marriage. 

 

Much the same seems to hold true of criminality. It was long 

since noted by Horsley that in England marriage decidedly 

increases the tendency to crime in women, though it decidedly 

decreases it in men. Prinzing has shown (_Zeitschrift fuer 

Sozialwissenschaft_, Bd. ii, 1899) that this is also the case in 

Germany. 

 

Similarly marriage decreases the tendency of men to become 

habitual drunkards and increases that of women. Notwithstanding 

the fact that the average age of the men is greater than that of 

the women, the majority of the men admitted to the inebriate 

reformatories under the English Inebriates Acts are single; the 

majority of the women are married; of 865 women so admitted 32 

per cent, were single, 50 per cent, married, and 18 per cent, 

widows. (_British Medical Journal_, Sept. 2, 1911, p. 518.) 

 

It thus happens that even the elementary characters of the sexual impulse 

in women still arouse, even among the most competent physiological and 

medical authorities,--not least so when they are themselves women,--the 

most divergent opinions. Its very existence even may be said to be 

questioned. It would generally be agreed that among men the strength of 

the sexual impulse varies within a considerable range, but that it is very 

rarely altogether absent, such total absence being abnormal and probably 

more or less pathological. But if applied to women, this statement is by 

no means always accepted. By many, sexual anesthesia is considered natural 

in women, some even declaring that any other opinion would be degrading to 

women; even by those who do not hold this opinion it is believed that 

there is an unnatural prevalence of sexual frigidity among civilized 

women. On these grounds it is desirable to deal generally with this and 

other elementary questions of allied character. 

 

I. 

 

The Primitive View of Women--As a Supernatural Element in Life--As 

Peculiarly Embodying the Sexual Instinct--The Modern Tendency to 

Underestimate the Sexual Impulse in Women--This Tendency Confined to 

Recent Times--Sexual Anaesthesia--Its Prevalence--Difficulties in 

Investigating the Subject--Some Attempts to Investigate it--Sexual 

Anesthesia must be Regarded as Abnormal--The Tendency to Spontaneous 

Manifestations of the Sexual Impulse in Young Girls at Puberty. 

 

 

From very early times it seems possible to trace two streams of opinion 

regarding women: on the one hand, a tendency to regard women as a 

supernatural element in life, more or less superior to men, and, on the 

other hand, a tendency to regard women as especially embodying the sexual 

instinct and as peculiarly prone to exhibit its manifestations. 

 

In the most primitive societies, indeed, the two views seem to be to some 

extent amalgamated; or, it should rather be said, they have not yet been 

differentiated; and, as in such societies it is usual to venerate the 

generative principle of nature and its embodiments in the human body and 


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