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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

assume unusual importance, or even to occupy the whole field of sexual 

consciousness, the part becoming a symbol that stands for the whole. When 

we come to the discussion of this great group of abnormal sexual 

manifestations it will frequently be necessary to refer to the results we 

have reached in studying the sexual significance of pain. 

 

 

FOOTNOTES: 

 

[154] See, for instance, the section "Zur Physiologie der Kunst" in 

Nietzsche's fragmentary work, _Der Wille zur Macht_, Werke, Bd. xv. Groos 

(_Spiele der Menschen_, p. 89) refers to the significance of the fact that 

nearly all races have special methods of procuring intoxication. Cf. 

Partridge's study of the psychology of alcohol (_American Journal of 

Psychology_, April, 1900). "It is hard to imagine," this writer remarks of 

intoxicants, "what the religious or social consciousness of primitive man 

would have been without them." 

 

[155] The muscular element is the most conspicuous in emotion, though it 

is not possible, as a careful student of the emotions (H.R. Marshall, 

_Pain, Pleasure, and AEsthetics_, p. 84) well points out, "to limit the 

physical activities involved with the emotions to such effects of 

voluntary innervation or alteration of size of blood-vessels or spasm of 

organic muscle, as Lange seems to think determines them; nor to increase 

or decrease of muscle-power, as Fere's results might suggest; nor to such 

changes, in relation of size of capillaries, in voluntary innervation, in 

respiratory and heart functioning, as Lehmann has observed. Emotions seem 

to me to be coincidents of reactions of the whole organism tending to 

certain results." 

 


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