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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

pain is equally great whether the pain is inflicted, suffered, witnessed, 

or merely exists as a mental imagination, and there is no reason why it 

should not coexist in all these forms in the same person, as, in fact, we 

frequently find it. 

 

The particular emotions which are invoked by pain to reinforce the sexual 

impulse are more especially anger and fear, and, as we have seen, these 

two very powerful and primitive emotions are--on the active and passive 

sides, respectively--the emotions most constantly brought into play in 

animal and early human courtship; so that they naturally constitute the 

emotional reservoirs from which the sexual impulse may still most easily 

draw. It is not difficult to show that the various forms in which 

"pain"--as we must here understand pain--is employed in the service of the 

sexual impulse are mainly manifestations or transformations of anger or 

fear, either in their simple or usually more complex forms, in some of 

which anger and fear may be mingled. 

 

We thus accept the biological origin of the psychological association 

between love and pain; it is traceable to the phenomena of animal 

courtship. We do not on this account exclude the more direct physiological 

factor. It may seem surprising that manifestations that have their origin 

in primeval forms of courtship should in many cases coincide with actual 

sensations of definite anatomical base today, and still more surprising 

that these traditional manifestations and actual sensations should so 

often be complementary to each other in their active and passive aspects: 

that is to say, that the pleasure of whipping should be matched by the 

pleasure of being whipped, the pleasure of mock strangling by the pleasure 

of being so strangled, that pain inflicted is not more desirable than pain 

suffered. But such coincidence is of the very essence of the whole group 

of phenomena. The manifestations of courtship were from the first 

conditioned by physiological facts; it is not strange that they should 

always tend to run _pari passu_ with physiological facts. The 

manifestations which failed to find anchorage in physiological 

relationships might well tend to die out. Even under the most normal 

circumstances, in healthy persons of healthy heredity, the manifestations 

we have been considering are liable to make themselves felt. Under such 

circumstances, however, they never become of the first importance in the 

sexual process; they are often little more than play. It is only under 

neurasthenic or neuropathic conditions--that is to say, in an organism 

which from acquired or congenital causes, and usually perhaps both, has 

become enfeebled, irritable, "fatigued"--that these manifestations are 

liable to flourish vigorously, to come to the forefront of sexual 

consciousness, and even to attain such seriously urgent importance that 

they may in themselves constitute the entire end and aim of sexual desire. 

Under these pathological conditions, pain, in the broad and special sense 

in which we have been obliged to define it, becomes a welcome tonic and a 

more or less indispensable stimulant to the sexual system. 

 

It will not have escaped the careful reader that in following out our 

subject we have sometimes been brought into contact with manifestations 

which scarcely seem to come within any definition of pain. This is 

undoubtedly so, and the references to these manifestations were not 

accidental, for they serve to indicate the real bearings of our subject. 

The relationships of love and pain constitute a subject at once of so 

much gravity and so much psychological significance that it was well to 

devote to them a special study. But pain, as we have here to understand 

it, largely constitutes a special case of what we shall later learn to 

know as erotic symbolism: that is to say, the psychic condition in which a 

part of the sexual process, a single idea or group of ideas, tends to 


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