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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

VII. 

 

Summary of Results Reached--The Joy of Emotional Expansion--The 

Satisfaction of the Craving for Power--The Influence of Neurasthenic and 

Neuropathic Conditions--The Problem of Pain in Love Largely Constitutes a 

Special Case of Erotic Symbolism. 

 

 

It may seem to some that in our discussion of the relationships of love 

and pain we have covered a very wide field. This was inevitable. The 

subject is peculiarly difficult and complex, and if we are to gain a real 

insight into its nature we must not attempt to force the facts to fit into 

any narrow and artificial formulas of our own construction. Yet, as we 

have unraveled this seemingly confused mass of phenomena it will not have 

escaped the careful reader that the apparently diverse threads we have 

disentangled run in a parallel and uniform manner; they all have a like 

source and they all converge to a like result. We have seen that the 

starting-point of the whole group of manifestations must be found in the 

essential facts of courtship among animal and primitive human societies. 

Pain is seldom very far from some of the phases of primitive courtship; 

but it is not the pain which is the essential element in courtship, it is 

the state of intense emotion, of tumescence, with which at any moment, in 

some shape or another, pain may, in some way or another, be brought into 

connection. So that we have come to see that in the phrase "love and pain" 

we have to understand by "pain" a state of intense emotional excitement 

with which pain in the stricter sense may be associated, but is by no 

means necessarily associated. It is the strong emotion which exerts the 

irresistible fascination in the lover, in his partner, or in both. The 

pain is merely the means to that end. It is the lever which is employed to 

bring the emotional force to bear on the sexual impulse. The question of 

love and pain is mainly a question of emotional dynamics. 

 

In attaining this view of our subject we have learned that any impulse of 

true cruelty is almost outside the field altogether. The mistake was 

indeed obvious and inevitable. Let us suppose that every musical 

instrument is sensitive and that every musical performance involves the 

infliction of pain on the instrument. It would then be very difficult 

indeed to realize that the pleasure of music lies by no means in the 

infliction of pain. We should certainly find would-be scientific and 

analytical people ready to declare that the pleasure of music is the 

pleasure of giving pain, and that the emotional effects of music are due 

to the pain thus inflicted. In algolagnia, as in music, it is not cruelty 

that is sought; it is the joy of being plunged among the waves of that 

great primitive ocean of emotions which underlies the variegated world of 

our everyday lives, and pain--a pain which, as we have seen, is often 

deprived so far as possible of cruelty, though sometimes by very thin and 

feeble devices--is merely the channel by which that ocean is reached. 

 

If we try to carry our inquiry beyond the point we have been content to 

reach, and ask ourselves why this emotional intoxication exerts so 

irresistible a fascination, we might find a final reply in the explanation 

of Nietzsche--who regarded this kind of intoxication as of great 

significance both in life and in art--that it gives us the consciousness 

of energy and the satisfaction of our craving for power.[154] To carry the 

inquiry to this point would be, however, to take it into a somewhat 

speculative and metaphysical region, and we have perhaps done well not to 

attempt to analyze further the joy of emotional expansion. We must be 

content to regard the profound satisfaction of emotion as due to a 

widespread motor excitement, the elements of which we cannot yet 

completely analyze.[155] 

 

It is because the joy of emotional intoxication is the end really sought 

that we have to regard the supposed opposition between "sadism" and 

"masochism" as unimportant and indeed misleading. The emotional value of 


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