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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

but that as the corpse occupied the other bedroom he would have 

to share their bed ("We don't think very much of that among us," 

my informant added). He agreed, and went to bed, and when, a 

little later, the two women also came to bed, the girl, at her 

own suggestion, lay next to the youth. Nothing happened during 

the night, but in the morning, when the mother went down to light 

the fire, the daughter immediately threw off the bedclothes, 

exposing her naked person, and before the youth had realized what 

was happening she had drawn him over on to her. He was so utterly 

surprised that nothing whatever happened, but the incident made a 

life-long impression on him. 

 

In this connection reference may be made to the story of the 

Ephesian matron in Petronius; the story of the widow, overcome by 

grief, who watches by her husband's tomb, and very speedily falls 

into the arms of the soldier who is on guard. This story, in very 

various forms, is found in China and India, and has occurred 

repeatedly in European literature during the last two thousand 

years. The history of the wanderings of this story has been told 

by Grisebach (Eduard Grisebach, _Die Treulose Witwe_, third 

edition, 1877). It is not probable, however, that all the stories 

of this type are actually related; in any case it would seem that 

their vitality is due to the fact that they have been found to 

show a real correspondence to life; one may note, for instance, 

the curious tone of personal emotion with which George Chapman 

treated this theme in his play, _Widow's Tears_. 

 

It may be added that, in explaining the resort to pain as an emotional 

stimulus, we have to take into account not only the biological and 

psychological considerations here brought forward, but also the abnormal 

physiological conditions under which stimuli usually felt as painful come 

specially to possess a sexually exciting influence. The neurasthenic and 

neuropathic states may be regarded as conditions of more or less permanent 

fatigue. It is true that under the conditions we are considering there may 

be an extreme sensitiveness to stimuli not usually felt as of sexual 

character, a kind of hyperesthesia; but hyperesthesia, it has well been 

said, is nothing but the beginning of anesthesia.[151] Sergeant Bertrand, 

the classical example of necrophily,[152] began to masturbate at the age 

of 9, stimulating a sexual impulse which may have been congenitally feeble 

by accompanying thoughts of ill-treating women. It was not till 

subsequently that he began to imagine that the women were corpses. The 

sadistic thoughts were only incidents in the emotional evolution, and the 

real object throughout was to procure strong emotion and not to inflict 

cruelty. Some observations of Fere's as to the conditions which influence 

the amount of muscular work accomplished with the ergograph are 

instructive from the present point of view: "Although sensibility 

diminishes in the course of fatigue," Fere found that "there are periods 

during which the excitability increases before it disappears. As fatigue 

increases, the perception of the intercurrent excitation is retarded; an 

odor is perceived as exciting before it is perceived as a differentiated 

sensation; the most fetid odors arouse feelings of well-being before being 

perceived as odors, and their painful quality only appears afterward, or 

is not noticed at all." And after recording a series of results with the 

ergograph obtained under the stimulus of unpleasant odors he remarks: "We 

are thus struck by two facts: the diminution of work during painful 

excitation, and its increase when the excitation has ceased. When the 

effects following the excitation have disappeared the diminution is more 

rapid than in the ordinary state. When the fatigue is manifested by a 

notable diminution, if the same excitation is brought into action again, 


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