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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Even when the emotion aroused is disgust it may still act as a sexual 

stimulant. Stcherbak has narrated the instructive case of a very 

intelligent and elegant married lady of rather delicate constitution, an 

artist of some talent, who never experienced any pleasure in sexual 

intercourse, but ever since sexual feelings first began to be manifested 

at all (at the age of 18) has only experienced them in relation to 

disgusting things. Anything that is repulsive, like vomit, etc., causes 

vague but pleasurable feelings which she gradually came to recognize as 

sexual. The sight of a crushed frog will cause very definite sexual 

sensations. She has had many admirers and she has observed that a 

declaration of love by a disagreeable or even repulsive man sexually 

excites her, though she has no desire for sexual intercourse with 

him.[147] 

 

 

 

After all that has gone before it is easy to see how the emotion of fear 

may act in an analogous manner to anger. Just as anger may reinforce the 

active forms of the sexual impulse to which it is allied, so fear may 

reinforce the passive forms of that impulse. The following observations, 

written by a lady, very well show how we may thus explain the sexual 

attractiveness of whipping: "The fascination of whipping, which has always 

greatly puzzled me, seems to be a sort of hankering after the stimulus of 

fear. In a wild state animals live in constant fear. In civilized life one 

but rarely feels it. A woman's pleasure in being afraid of a husband or 

lover may be an equivalent of a man's love of adventure; and the fear of 

children for their parents may be the dawning of the love of adventure. In 

a woman this desire of adventure receives a serious check when she begins 

to realize what she might be subjected to by a man if she gratified it. 

Excessive fear is demoralizing, but it seems to me that the idea of being 

whipped gives a sense of fear which is not excessive. It is almost the 

only kind of pain (physical) which is inflicted on children or women by 

persons whom they can love and trust, and with a moral object. Any other 

kind of bodily ill treatment suggests malignity and may rouse resentment, 

and, in extreme cases, an excess of fear which goes beyond the limits of 

pleasurable excitement. Given a hereditary feeling of this sort, I think 

it is helped by the want of actual experience, as the association with 

excitement is freed from the idea of pain as such." In his very valuable 

and suggestive study of fears, Stanley Hall, while recognizing the evil of 

excessive fear, has emphasized the emotional and even the intellectual 

benefits of fear, and the great part played by fear in the evolution of 

the race as "the rudimentary organ on the full development and subsequent 

reduction of which many of the best things in the soul are dependent." 

"Fears that paralyze some brains," he remarks, "are a good tonic for 

others. In some form and degree all need it always. Without the fear 

apparatus in us, what a wealth of motive would be lost!"[148] 

 

It is on the basis of this tonic influence of fear that in some morbidly 

sensitive natures fear acts as a sexual stimulant. Cullerre has brought 

together a number of cases in both men and women, mostly neurasthenic, in 

which fits of extreme anxiety and dread, sometimes of a religious 

character and often in highly moral people, terminate in spontaneous 

orgasm or in masturbation.[149] 

 

Professor Gurlitt mentions that his first full sexual emission took place 

in class at school, when he was absorbed in writing out the life of 

Aristides and very anxious lest he should not be able to complete it 

within the set time.[150] 

 

Dread and anxiety not only excite sexual emotion, but in the more extreme 

morbid cases they may suppress and replace it. Terror, say Fliess, is 

transmuted coitus, and Freud believes that the neurosis of anxiety always 

has a sexual cause, while Ballet, Capgras, Loewenfeld, and others, though 

not regarding a sexual traumatism as the only cause, still regard it as 


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