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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

all courtship on one side or the other. It is usually on the side 

of the female, but not invariably. Among spiders, for instance, 

it is usually the male who feels fear, and very reasonably, for 

he is much weaker than the female. "Courtship by the male spider" 

says T.H. Montgomery ("The Courtship of Araneads," _American 

Naturalist_, March, 1910, p. 166), "results from a combination of 

the state of desire for and fear of the female." It is by his 

movements of fear that he advertises himself to the female as a 

male, and it is by the same movements that he is unconsciously 

impelled to display prominently his own ornamentation. 

 

We are thus brought to those essential facts of primitive courtship with 

which we started. But we are now able to understand more clearly how it is 

that alien emotional states became abnormally associated with the sexual 

life. Normally the sexual impulse is sufficiently reinforced by the 

ordinary active energies of the organism which courtship itself arouses, 

energies which, while they may be ultimately in part founded on anger and 

fear, rarely allow these emotions to be otherwise than latent. Motion, it 

may be said, is more prominent than emotion. 

 

Even normally a stimulant to emotional activities is pleasurable, just as 

motion itself is pleasurable. It may even be useful, as was noted long ago 

by Erasmus Darwin; he tells of a friend of his who, when painfully 

fatigued by riding, would call up ideas arousing indignation, and thus 

relieve the fatigue, the indignation, as Darwin pointed out, increasing 

muscular activity.[136] 

 

It is owing to this stimulating action that discomfort, even pain, may be 

welcomed on account of the emotional waves they call up, because they 

"lash into movement the dreary calm of the sea's soul," and produce that 

alternation of pain and enjoyment for which Faust longed. Groos, who 

recalls this passage in his very thorough and profound discussion of the 

region wherein tragedy has its psychological roots, points out that it is 

the overwhelming might of the storm itself, and not the peace of calm 

after the storm, which appeals to us. In the same way, he observes, even 

surprise and shock may also be pleasurable, and fear, though the most 

depressing of emotional states, by virtue of the joy produced by strong 

stimuli is felt as attractive; we not only experience an impulse of 

pleasure in dominating our environment, but also have pleasure in being 

dominated and rendered helpless by a higher power.[137] Hirn, again, in 

his work on the origins of art, has an interesting chapter on "The 

Enjoyment of Pain," a phenomenon which he explains by its resultant 

reactions in increase of outward activity, of motor excitement. Anger, he 

observes elsewhere, is "in its active stage a decidedly pleasurable 

emotion. Fear, which in its initial stage is paralyzing and depressing, 

often changes in time when the first shock has been relieved by motor 

reaction.... Anger, fear, sorrow, notwithstanding their distinctly painful 

initial stage, are often not only not avoided, but even deliberately 

sought."[138] 

 

In the ordinary healthy organism, however, although the stimulants of 

strong emotion may be vaguely pleasurable, they do not have more than a 

general action on the sexual sphere, nor are they required for the due 

action of the sexual mechanism. But in a slightly abnormal 

organism--whether the anomaly is due to a congenital neuropathic 

condition, or to a possibly acquired neurasthenic condition, or merely to 

the physiological inadequacy of childhood or old age--the balance of 

nervous energy is less favorable for the adequate play of the ordinary 

energies in courtship. The sexual impulse is itself usually weaker, even 

when, as often happens, its irritability assumes the fallacious appearance 

of strength. It has become unusually sensitive to unusual stimuli and 

also, it is possible,--perhaps as a result of those conditions,--more 


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