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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

furthering survival." (Lloyd Morgan, _Animal Behavior_, p. 293.) 

Emotional aptitudes persist not only by virtue of the fact that 

they are still beneficial, but because they once were; that is to 

say, they may exist as survivals. In this connection I may quote 

from a suggestive paper on "Teasing and Bullying," by F.L. Burk; 

at the conclusion of this study, which is founded on a large 

body of data concerning American children, the author asks: 

"Accepting for the moment the theories of Spencer and Ribot upon 

the transmission of rudimentary instincts, is it possible that 

the movements which comprise the chief elements of bullying, 

teasing, and the egotistic impulses in general of the classes 

cited--pursuing, throwing down, punching, striking, throwing 

missiles, etc.--are, from the standpoint of consciousness, broken 

neurological fragments, which are parts of old chains of activity 

involved in the pursuit, combat, capture, torture, and killing of 

men and enemies?... Is not this hypothesis of transmitted 

fragments of instincts in accord with the strangely anomalous 

fact that children are at one moment seemingly cruel and at the 

next affectionate and kind, vibrating, as it were, between two 

worlds, egotistic and altruistic, without conscious sense of 

incongruity?" (F.L. Burk, "Teasing and Bullying," _Pedagogical 

Seminary_, April, 1897.) 

 

The primitive connection of the special emotions of anger and 

fear with the sexual impulse has been well expressed by Colin 

Scott in his remarkable study of "Sex and Art": "If the higher 

forms of courting are based on combat, among the males at least 

anger must be intimately associated with love. And below both of 

these lies the possibility of fear. In combat the animal is 

defeated who is first afraid. Competitive exhibition of prowess 

will inspire the less able birds with a deterring fear. Young 

grouse and woodcock do not enter the lists with the older birds, 

and sing very quietly. It is the same with the very oldest birds. 

Audubon says that the old maids and bachelors of the Canada goose 

move off by themselves during the courting of the younger birds. 

In order to succeed in love, fear must be overcome in the male as 

well as in the female. Courage is the essential male virtue, love 

is its outcome and reward. The strutting, crowing, dancing, and 

singing of male birds and the preliminary movements generally of 

animals must gorge the neuromotor and muscular systems with blood 

and put them in better fighting trim. The effects of this upon 

the feelings of the animal himself must be very great. Hereditary 

tendencies swell his heart. He has 'the joy that warriors feel.' 

He becomes regardless of danger, and sometimes almost oblivious 

of his surroundings. This intense passionateness must react 

powerfully on the whole system, and more particularly on those 

parts which are capable, such as the brain, of using up a great 

surplus of blood, and on the naturally erethic functions of sex. 

The flood of anger or fighting instinct is drained off by the 

sexual desires, the antipathy of the female is overcome, and 

sexual union successfully ensues.... Courting and combat shade 

into one another, courting tending to take the place of the more 

basal form of combat. The passions which thus come to be 

associated with love are those of fear and anger, both of which, 

by arousing the whole nature and stimulating the nutritive 

sources from which they flow, come to increase the force of the 

sexual passion to which they lead up and in which they culminate 

and are absorbed," (Colin Scott, "Sex and Art," _American Journal 

of Psychology_, vol. vii, No. 2, pp. 170 and 215.) 

 

It must be remembered that fear is an element liable to arise in 


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