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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

present in 21, while the latter was unchanged in 18 cases and 

diminished or lost in 60. Keppler (International Medical 

Congress, Berlin, 1890) found that among 46 castrated women 

sexual feeling was in no case abolished. Adler also, who 

discusses this question (_Die Mangelhafte Geschlechtsempfindung 

des Weibes_, 1904, p. 75 et seq.), criticises Glaeveke's 

statements and concludes that there is no strict relation between 

the sexual organs and the sexual feelings. Kisch, who has known 

several cases in which the feelings remained the same as before 

the operation, brings together (_The Sexual Life of Women_) 

varying opinions of numerous authors regarding the effects of 

removal of the ovaries on the sexual appetite. 

 

In America Bloom (as quoted in _Medical Standard_, 1896, p. 121) 

found that in none of the cases of women investigated, in which 

ooephorectomy had been performed before the age of 33, was the 

sexual appetite entirely lost; in most of them it had not 

materially diminished and in a few it was intensified. There 

was, however, a general consensus of opinion that the normal 

vaginal secretion during coitus was greatly lessened. In the 

cases of women over 33, including also hysterectomies, a gradual 

lessening of sexual feeling and desire was found to occur most 

generally. Dr. Isabel Davenport records 2 cases (reported in 

_Medical Standard_, 1895, p. 346) of women between 30 and 35 

years of age whose erotic tendencies were extreme; the ovaries 

and tubes were removed, in one case for disease, in the other 

with a view of removing the sexual tendencies; in neither case 

was there any change. Lapthorn Smith (_Medical Record_, vol. 

xlviii) has reported the case of an unmarried woman of 24 whose 

ovaries and tubes had been removed seven years previously for 

pain and enlargement, and the periods had disappeared for six 

years; she had had experience of sexual intercourse, and declared 

that she had never felt such extreme sexual excitement and 

pleasure as during coitus at the end of this time. 

 

In England Lawson Tait and Bantock (_British Medical Journal_, 

October 14, 1899, p. 975) have noted that sexual passion seems 

sometimes to be increased even after the removal of ovaries, 

tubes, and uterus. Lawson Tait also stated (_British 

Gynaecological Journal_, Feb., 1887, p. 534) that after systematic 

and extensive inquiry he had not found a single instance in 

which, provided that sexual appetite existed before the removal 

of the appendages, it was abolished by that operation. A Medical 

Inquiry Committee appointed by the Liverpool Medical Institute 

(ibid., p. 617) had previously reported that a considerable 

number of patients stated that they had suffered a distinct loss 

of sexual feeling. Lawson Tait, however, throws doubts on the 

reliability of the Committee's results, which were based on the 

statements of unintelligent hospital patients. 

 

I may quote the following remarks from a communication sent to me 

by an experienced physician in Australia: "No rule can be laid 

down in cases in which both ovaries have been extirpated. Some 

women say that, though formerly passionate, they have since 

become quite indifferent, but I am of opinion that the majority 

of women who have had prior sexual experience retain desire and 

gratification in an equal degree to that they had before 

operation. I know one case in which a young girl hardly 19 years 

old, who had been accustomed to congress for some twelve months, 

had trouble which necessitated the removal of the ovaries and 

tubes on both sides. Far from losing all her desire or 

gratification, both were very materially increased in intensity. 

Menstruation has entirely ceased, without loss of femininity in 


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