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CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Sexualempfindung_, 1899, pp. 507-510.) 

 

This case is interesting as an uncomplicated example of almost 

purely ideal sadism. It is interesting to note the feelings of 

the sadist subject toward her imaginary lover's feelings. It is 

probably significant that, while his pleasure is regarded as 

essential, his pain is regarded as even more essential, and the 

resulting apparent confusion may well be of the very essence of 

the whole phenomenon. The pleasure of the imaginary lover must be 

secured or the manifestation passes out of the sexual sphere; but 

his pleasure must, at all costs, be conciliated with his pain, 

for in the sadist's eyes the victim's pain has become a vicarious 

form of sexual emotion. That, at the same time, the sadist 

desires to give pleasure rather than pain finds confirmation in 

the fact that he often insists on pleasure being feigned even 

though it is not felt. Some years ago a rich Jewish merchant 

became notorious for torturing girls with whom he had 

intercourse; his performances acquired for him the title of 

"_l'homme qui pique_," and led to his prosecution. It was his 

custom to spend some hours in sticking pins into various parts of 

the girl's body, but it was essential that she should wear a 

smiling face throughout the proceedings. (Hamon, _La France 

Sociale et Politique_, 1891, p. 445 et seq.) 

 

We have thus to recognize that sadism by no means involves any love of 

inflicting pain outside the sphere of sexual emotion, and is even 

compatible with a high degree of general tender-heartedness. We have also 

to recognize that even within the sexual sphere the sadist by no means 

wishes to exclude the victim's pleasure, and may even regard that pleasure 

as essential to his own satisfaction. We have, further, to recognize that, 

in view of the close connection between sadism and masochism, it is highly 

probable that in some cases the sadist is really a disguised masochist and 

enjoys his victim's pain because he identifies himself with that pain. 

 

But there is a further group of cases, and a very important group, on 

account of the light it throws on the essential nature of these phenomena, 

and that is the group in which the thought or the spectacle of pain acts 

as a sexual stimulant, without the subject identifying himself clearly 

either with the inflicter or the sufferer of the pain. Such cases are 

sometimes classed as sadistic; but this is incorrect, for they might just 

as truly be called masochistic. The term algolagnia might properly be 

applied to them (and Eulenburg now classes them as "ideal algolagnia"), 

for they reveal an undifferentiated connection between sexual excitement 

and pain not developed into either active or passive participation. Such 

feelings may arise sporadically in persons in whom no sadistic or 

masochistic perversion can be said to exist, though they usually appear in 

individuals of neurotic temperament. Casanova describes an instance of 

this association which came immediately under his own eyes at the torture 

and execution of Damiens in 1757.[129] W.G. Stearns knew a man (having 

masturbated and had intercourse to excess) who desired to see his wife 

delivered of a child, and finally became impotent without this idea. He 

witnessed many deliveries and especially obtained voluptuous gratification 

at the delivery of a primipara when the suffering was greatest.[130] A 

very trifling episode may, however, suffice. In one case known to me a 

man, neither sadistic nor masochistic in his tendencies, when sitting 

looking out of his window saw a spider come out of its hole to capture and 

infold a fly which had just been caught in its web; as he watched the 

process he became conscious of a powerful erection, an occurrence which 

had never taken place under such circumstances before.[131] Under favoring 

conditions some incident of this kind at an early age may exert a decisive 


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