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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

suspension, swinging, restraint, and fetters. Strangulation is the extreme 

and most decided type of this group of imagined or real situations, in all 

of which a respiratory disturbance seems to be an essential element.[126] 

 

In explaining these phenomena we have to remark that respiratory 

excitement has always been a conspicuous part of the whole process of 

tumescence and detumescence, of the struggles of courtship and of its 

climax, and that any restraint upon respiration, or, indeed, any restraint 

upon muscular and emotional activity generally, tends to heighten the 

state of sexual excitement associated with such activity. 

 

I have elsewhere, when studying the spontaneous solitary 

manifestation of the sexual instinct (_Auto-erotism_, in vol. i 

of these _Studies_), referred to the pleasurably emotional, and 

sometimes sexual, effects of swinging and similar kinds of 

movement. It is possible that there is a certain significance in 

the frequency with which the eighteenth-century French painters, 

who lived at a time when the refinements of sexual emotion were 

carefully sought out, have painted women in the act of swinging. 

Fragonard mentions that in 1763 a gentleman invited him into the 

country, with the request to paint his mistress, especially 

stipulating that she should be depicted in a swing. The same 

motive was common among the leading artists of that time. It may 

be said that this attitude was merely a pretext to secure a 

vision of ankles, but that result could easily have been attained 

without the aid of the swing. 

 

I may here quote, as bearing on this and allied questions, a 

somewhat lengthy communication from a lady to whom I am indebted 

for many subtle and suggestive remarks on the whole of this group 

of manifestations:-- 

 

"With regard to the connection between swinging and suspension, 

perhaps the physical basis of it is the loss of breath. Temporary 

loss of breath with me produces excitement. Swinging at a height 

or a fall from a height would cause loss of breath; in a state of 

suspension the imagination would suggest the idea of falling and 

the attendant loss of breath. People suffering from lung disease 

are often erotically inclined, and anesthetics affect the 

breathing. Men also seem to like the idea of suspension, but from 

the active side. One man used to put his wife on a high swinging 

shelf when she displeased him, and my husband told me once he 

would like to suspend me to a crane we were watching at work, 

though I have never mentioned my own feeling on this point to 

him. Suspension is often mentioned in descriptions of torture. 

Beatrice Cenci was hung up by her hair and the recently murdered 

Queen of Korea was similarly treated. In Tolstoi's _My Husband 

and I_ the girl says she would like her husband to hold her over 

a precipice. That passage gave me great pleasure.[127] 

 

"The idea of slipping off an inclined plane gives me the same 

sensation. I always feel it on seeing Michael Angelo's 'Night,' 

though the slipping look displeases me artistically. I remember 

that when I saw the 'Night' first I did feel excited and was 

annoyed, and it seemed to me it was the slipping-off look that 

gave it; but I think I am now less affected by that idea. Certain 

general ideas seem to excite one, but the particular forms under 

which they are presented lose their effect and have to be varied. 

The sentence mentioned in Tolstoi leaves me now quite cold, but 

if I came across the same idea elsewhere, expressed differently, 

then it would excite me. I am very capricious in the small 

things, and I think women are so more than men. The idea of 

slipping down a plank formerly produced excitement with me; now 

it has a less vivid effect, though the idea of loss of breath 

still produces excitement. The idea of the plank does not now 


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