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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

Flagellation as a penance, whether inflicted by the penitent 

himself or by another person, was also extremely common in 

medieval and later days. According to Walsingham ("Master of the 

Rolls' Collection," vol. i, p. 275), in England, in the middle of 

the fourteenth century, penitents, sometimes men of noble birth, 

would severely flagellate themselves, even to the shedding of 

blood, weeping or singing as they did so; they used cords with 

knots containing nails. 

 

 

At a later time the custom of religious flagellation was more 

especially preserved in Spain. The Countess d'Aulnoy, who visited 

Spain in 1685, has described the flagellations practised in 

public at Madrid. After giving an account of the dress worn by 

these flagellants, which corresponds to that worn in Spain in 

Holy Week at the present time by the members of the _Cofradias_, 

the face concealed by the high sugar-loaf head-covering, she 

continues: "They attach ribbons to their scourges, and usually 

their mistresses honor them with their favors. In gaining public 

admiration they must not gesticulate with the arm, but only move 

the wrist and hand; the blows must be given without haste, and 

the blood must not spoil the costume. They make terrible wounds 

on their shoulders, from which the blood flows in streams; they 

march through the streets with measured steps; they pass before 

the windows of their mistresses, where they flagellate themselves 

with marvelous patience. The lady gazes at this fine sight 

through the blinds of her room, and by a sign she encourages him 

to flog himself, and lets him understand how much she likes this 

sort of gallantry. When they meet a good-looking woman they 

strike themselves in such a way that the blood goes on to her; 

this is a great honor, and the grateful lady thanks them.... All 

this is true to the letter." 

 

The Countess proceeds to describe other and more genuine 

penitents, often of high birth, who may be seen in the street 

naked above the waist, and with naked feet on the rough and sharp 

pavement; some had swords passed through the skin of their body 

and arms, others heavy crosses that weighed them down. She 

remarks that she was told by the Papal Nuncio that he had 

forbidden confessors to impose such penances, and that they were 

due to the devotion of the penitents themselves. (_Relation du 

Voyage d'Espagne_, 1692, vol. ii, pp. 158-164.) 

 

The practice of public self-flagellation in church during Lent 

existed in Spain and Portugal up to the early years of the 

nineteenth century. Descriptions of it will often be met with in 

old volumes of travel. Thus, I find a traveler through Spain in 

1786 describing how, at Barcelona, he was present when, in Lent, 

at a Miserere in the Convent Church of San Felipe Neri on Friday 

evening the doors were shut, the lights put out, and in perfect 

darkness all bared their backs and applied the discipline, 

singing while they scourged themselves, ever louder and harsher 

and with ever greater vehemence until in twenty minutes' time the 

whole ended in a deep groan. It is mentioned that at Malaga, 

after such a scene, the whole church was in the morning sprinkled 

with blood. (Joseph Townsend, _A Journey through Spain in 1786_, 

vol. i, p. 122; vol. iii, p. 15.) 

 

Even to our own day religious self-flagellation is practised by 

Spaniards in the Azores, in the darkened churches during Lent, 

and the walls are often spotted and smeared with blood at this 

time. (O.H. Howarth, "The Survival of Corporal Punishment," 

_Journal Anthropological Institute_, Feb., 1889.) In remote 

districts of Spain (as near Haro in Rioja) there are also 

brotherhoods who will flagellate themselves on Good Friday, but 

not within the church. (Dario de Regoyos, _Espana Negra_, 1899, 


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