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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

which produced nausea. He was evidently a neurotic subject. 

(L.C.F. Garmanni et Aliorum Virorum Clarissimorum, _Epistolarum 

Centuria_, Rostochi et Lipsiae, 1714.) 

 

In England we find that toward the end of the sixteenth century 

one of Marlowe's epigrams deals with a certain Francus who before 

intercourse with his mistress "sends for rods and strips himself 

stark naked," and by the middle of the seventeenth century the 

existence of an association between flagellation and sexual 

pleasure seems to have been popularly recognized. In 1661, in a 

vulgar "tragicomedy" entitled _The Presbyterian Lash_, we find: 

"I warrant he thought that the tickling of the wench's buttocks 

with the rod would provoke her to lechery." That whipping was 

well known as a sexual stimulant in England in the eighteenth 

century is sufficiently indicated by the fact that in one of 

Hogarth's series representing the "Harlot's Progress" a birch rod 

hangs over the bed. The prevalence of sexual flagellation in 

England at the end of that century and the beginning of the 

nineteenth is discussed by Duehren (Iwan Bloch) in his 

_Geschlechtsleben in England_ (1901-3), especially vol. ii, ch. 

vi. 

 

While, however, the evidence regarding sexual flagellation is 

rare, until recent times whipping as a punishment was extremely 

common. It is even possible that its very prevalence, and the 

consequent familiarity with which it was regarded, were 

unfavorable to the development of any mysterious emotional state 

likely to act on the sexual sphere, except in markedly neurotic 

subjects. Thus, the corporal chastisement of wives by husbands 

was common and permitted. Not only was this so to a proverbial 

extent in eastern Europe, but also in the extreme west and among 

a people whose women enjoyed much freedom and honor. Cymric law 

allowed a husband to chastise his wife for angry speaking, such 

as calling him a cur; for giving away property she was not 

entitled to give away; or for being found in hiding with another 

man. For the first two offenses she had the option of paying him 

three kine. When she accepted the chastisement she was to receive 

"three strokes with a rod of the length of her husband's forearm 

and the thickness of his long finger, and that wheresoever he 

might will, excepting on the head"; so that she was to suffer 

pain only, and not injury. (R.B. Holt, "Marriage Laws and Customs 

of the Cymri," _Journal of the Anthropological Institute_, 

August-November, 1898, p. 162.) 

 

"The Cymric law," writes a correspondent, "seems to have survived 

in popular belief in the Eastern and Middle States of the United 

States. In police-courts in New York, for example, it has been 

unsuccessfully pleaded that a man is entitled to beat his wife 

with a stick no thicker than his thumb. In Pennsylvania actual 

acquittals have been rendered." 

 

Among all classes children were severely whipped by their parents 

and others in authority over them. It may be recalled that in the 

twelfth century when Abelard became tutor to Heloise, then about 

18 years of age, her uncle authorized him to beat her, if 

negligent in her studies. Even in the sixteenth century Jeanne 

d'Albert, who became the mother of Henry IV of France, at the 

age of 131/2 was married to the Duke of Cleves, and to overcome her 

resistance to this union the Queen, her mother, had her whipped 

to such an extent that she thought she would die of it. The whip 

on this occasion was, however, only partially successful, for the 

Duke never succeeded in consummating the marriage, which was, in 

consequence, annulled. (Cabanes brings together numerous facts 

regarding the prevalence of flagellation as a chastisement in 

ancient France in the interesting chapter on "La Flagellation a 


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