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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

allied subjects issued by a German publisher and bookseller, I find that, 

of fifty-five volumes, as many as seventeen or eighteen, all in German, 

deal solely with the question of flagellation, while many of the other 

books appear to deal in part with the same subject.[111] It is, no doubt, 

true that the large part which the rod has played in the past history of 

our civilization justifies a considerable amount of scientific interest in 

the subject of flagellation, but it is clear that the interest in these 

books is by no means always scientific, but very frequently sexual. 

 

It is remarkable that, while the sexual associations of whipping, 

whether in slight or in marked degrees, are so frequent in modern 

times, they appear to be by no means easy to trace in ancient 

times. "Flagellation," I find it stated by a modern editor of the 

_Priapeia_, "so extensively practised in England as a provocation 

to venery, is almost entirely unnoticed by the Latin erotic 

writers, although, in the _Satyricon_ of Petronius (ch. 

cxxxviii), Encolpius, in describing the steps taken by OEnothea 

to undo the temporary impotence to which he was subjected, says: 

'Next she mixed nasturtium-juice with southern wood, and, having 

bathed my foreparts, she took a bunch of green nettles, and 

gently whipped my belly all over below the navel.'" It appears 

also that many ancient courtesans dedicated to Venus as ex-votos 

a whip, a bridle, or a spur as tokens of their skill in riding 

their lovers. The whip was sometimes used in antiquity, but if it 

aroused sexual emotions they seem to have passed unregarded. "We 

naturally know nothing," Eulenburg remarks (_Sadismus und 

Masochismus_, p. 72), "of the feelings of the priestess of 

Artemis at the flagellation of Spartan youths; or what emotions 

inspired the priestess of the Syrian goddess under similar 

circumstances; or what the Roman Pontifex Maximus felt when he 

castigated the exposed body of a negligent vestal (as described 

by Plutarch) behind a curtain, and the 'plagosus Orbilius' only 

practised on children." 

 

It was at the Renaissance that cases of abnormal sexual pleasure 

in flagellation began to be recorded. The earliest distinct 

reference to a masochistic flagellant seems to have been made by 

Pico della Mirandola, toward the end of the fifteenth century, in 

his _Disputationes Adversus Astrologiam Divinatricem_, bk. iii, 

ch. xxvii. Coelius Rhodiginus in 1516, again, narrated the case 

of a man he knew who liked to be severely whipped, and found this 

a stimulant to coitus. Otto Brunfels, in his _Onomasticon_ 

(1534), art. "Coitus," refers to another case of a man who could 

not have intercourse with his wife until he had been whipped. 

Then, a century later, in 1643, Meibomius wrote _De Usu Flagrorum 

in re Venerea_, the earliest treatise on this subject, narrating 

various cases. Numerous old cases of pleasure in flagellation and 

urtication were brought together by Schurig in 1720 in his 

_Spermatologia_, pp. 253-258. 

 

The earliest definitely described medical case of sadistic 

pleasure in the sight of active whipping which I have myself come 

across belongs to the year 1672, and occurs in a letter in which 

Nesterus seeks the opinion of Garmann. He knows intimately, he 

states, a very learned man--whose name, for the honor he bears 

him, he refrains from mentioning--who, whenever in a school or 

elsewhere he sees a boy unbreeched and birched, and hears him 

crying out, at once emits semen copiously without any erection, 

but with great mental commotion. The same accident frequently 

happens to him during sleep, accompanied by dreams of whipping. 

Nesterus proceeds to mention that this "_laudatus vir_" was also 

extremely sensitive to the odor of strawberries and other fruits, 


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