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Table of contents
CONTENTS
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-1
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-2
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-3
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-4
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-5
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-6
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-7
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-8
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-9
ANALYSIS OF THE SEXUAL IMPULSE-10
FOOTNOTES
LOVE AND PAIN-1.1
LOVE AND PAIN-1.2
LOVE AND PAIN-1.3
LOVE AND PAIN-1.4
LOVE AND PAIN-1.5
LOVE AND PAIN-1.6
LOVE AND PAIN-2.1
LOVE AND PAIN-2.2
LOVE AND PAIN-2.3
LOVE AND PAIN-2.4
LOVE AND PAIN-3.1
LOVE AND PAIN-3.2
LOVE AND PAIN-3.3
LOVE AND PAIN-3.4
LOVE AND PAIN-4
LOVE AND PAIN-5.1
LOVE AND PAIN-5.2
LOVE AND PAIN-6.1
LOVE AND PAIN-6.2
LOVE AND PAIN-7
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.4
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.5
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-1.6
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.1
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.2
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-2.3
THE SEXUAL IMPULSE IN WOMEN-3
APPENDIX A-1
APPENDIX A-2-3
APPENDIX B HISTORY-1
APPENDIX B HISTORY-2
APPENDIX B HISTORY-3-4-5-6-7
APPENDIX B HISTORY-8-9-10
APPENDIX B HISTORY-11-12
APPENDIX B HISTORY-13
APPENDIX B HISTORY-14-15
APPENDIX B HISTORY-16
APPENDIX B HISTORY-17
APPENDIX B HISTORY-18
APPENDIX B HISTORY-19
INDEX OF AUTHORS

wicked; Huysmans's novel, _La-Bas_, which embodies a detailed 

study of Gilles de Rais, and F.H. Bernelle's These de Paris, _La 

Psychose de Gilles de Rais_, 1910.) 

 

The opinion has been hazarded that the history of Gilles de Rais 

is merely a legend. This view is not accepted, but there can be 

no doubt that the sadistic manifestations which occurred in the 

Middle Ages were mixed up with legendary and folk-lore elements. 

These elements centered on the conception of the _werwolf_, 

supposed to be a man temporarily transformed into a wolf with 

blood-thirsty impulses. (See, e.g., articles "Werwolf" and 

"Lycanthropy" in _Encyclopaedia Britannica_.) France, especially, 

was infested with werwolves in the sixteenth century. In 1603, 

however, it was decided at Bordeaux, in a trial involving a 

werwolf, that lycanthropy was only an insane delusion. Dumas 

("Les Loup-Garous," _Journal de Psychologie Normale et 

Pathologique_, May-June, 1907) argues that the medieval werwolves 

were sadists whose crimes were largely imaginative, though 

sometimes real, the predecessor of the modern Jack the Ripper. 

The complex nature of the elements making up the belief in the 

werwolf is emphasized by Ernest Jones, _Der Alptraum_, 1912. 

 

Related to the werwolf, but distinct, was the _vampire_, supposed 

to be a dead person who rose from the dead to suck the blood of 

the living during sleep. By way of reprisal the living dug up, 

exorcised, and mutilated the supposed vampires. This was called 

vampirism. The name vampire was then transferred to the living 

person who had so treated a corpse. All profanation of the 

corpse, whatever its origin, is now frequently called vampirism 

(Epaulow, _Vampirisme_, These de Lyon, 1901; id., "Le Vampire du 

Muy," _Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, Sept., 1903). The 

earliest definite reference to necrophily is in Herodotus, who 

tells (bk. ii, ch. lxxxix) of an Egyptian who had connection with 

the corpse of a woman recently dead. Epaulow gives various old 

cases and, at full length, the case which he himself 

investigated, of Ardisson, the "Vampire du Muy." W.A.F. Browne 

also has an interesting article on "Necrophilism" (_Journal of 

Mental Science_, Jan., 1875) which he regards as atavistic. When 

there is, in addition, mutilation of the corpse, the condition is 

termed necrosadism. There seems usually to be no true sadism in 

either necrosadism or necrophilism. (See, however, Bloch, 

_Beitraege_, vol. ii, p. 284 et seq.) 

 

It must be said also that cases of rape followed by murder are 

quite commonly not sadistic. The type of such cases is 

represented by Soleilland, who raped and then murdered children. 

He showed no sadistic perversion. He merely killed to prevent 

discovery, as a burglar who is interrupted may commit murder in 

order to escape. (E. Dupre, "L'Affaire Soleilland," _Archives 

d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, Jan.-Feb., 1910.) 

 

A careful and elaborate study of a completely developed sadist 

has been furnished by Lacassagne, Rousset, and Papillon 

("L'Affaire Reidal," _Archives d'Anthropologie Criminelle_, 

Oct.-Nov., 1907). Reidal, a youth of 18, a seminarist, was a 

congenital sanguinary sadist who killed another youth and was 

finally sent to an asylum. From the age of 4 he had voluptuous 

ideas connected with blood and killing, and liked to play at 

killing with other children. He was of infantile physical 

development, with a pleasant, childish expression of face, very 

religious, and hated obscenity and immorality. But the love of 

blood and murder was an irresistible obsession and its 

gratification produced immense emotional relief. 

 

Sadism generally has been especially studied by Lacassagne, 

_Vacher l'Eventreur et les Crimes Sadiques_, 1899. Zooesadism, or 


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